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5 Meeting Our Housing Need

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Introduction

A key role of the Local Plan, as emphasised by NPPF, is to meet, where possible, all identified housing needs and to deliver a wide choice of high quality homes, widen opportunities for home ownership and to create sustainable, inclusive and mixed communities. This includes meeting the needs of the various groups that have differing housing requirements. To significantly boost the supply of housing, local planning authorities should use their evidence base to ensure that their Local Plan meets fully the objectively assessed needs (OAN) for market and affordable housing in their housing market area. This needs to be consistent with the policies of the NPPF, including identifying key sites that are critical to the delivery of the housing strategy over the plan period.

The Local Plan needs to provide sufficient homes in order to meet our local needs and to help support the creation of sustainable communities. North Lincolnshire needs more homes because:

  • North Lincolnshire’s population is growing
  • People are living longer, with increasing life expectancy
  • It helps to maintain a local labour supply and support economic growth; and
  • To meet the housing need for everyone within North Lincolnshire.

Planning Practice Guidance sets out the actions required to identify the need for certain types of housing and the needs of different groups which will be addressed through the Local Plan. These groups are:

  • Private rented sector
  • Self-build and custom housebuilding
  • Family housing
  • Households with specific needs
  • Student housing
  • Travelling Communities
  • Housing for older people

Housing Land Allocations

The housing allocations provide a wide range of different types of sites across North Lincolnshire, to ensure choice and variety in the type of new housing that will become available over the Plan period in accordance with the Spatial Distribution Policy SS6p.

NPPF Paragraph 67 requires local planning authorities to prepare a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) to establish realistic assumptions about the availability, suitability and likely economic viability of land to meet the identified need for housing over the plan period. The Planning Practice Guidance requires local planning authorities to undertake assessments of land available for economic development at the same time as, or combined with the housing SHLAA.

The North Lincolnshire Strategic Housing and Economic Land Availability Assessment (SHELAA) 2019 is a combined assessment which assesses the amount of land available within North Lincolnshire that is potentially available to meet the identified need and demand for new employment and housing development. The SHELAA identifies that over the plan period there is sufficient 'developable' land to provide approximately 11,000 new dwellings on a range of sites.

The housing allocations are set out in Policy H1p. It is projected that 7,961 dwellings will be delivered on the Housing Allocations and committed sites during the Plan period. Taking account of housing completions to date and the number of dwellings expected to be delivered from extant planning permissions, a total of 7,300 dwellings are projected to be delivered between 2019/20 and 2035/36.

Table 1: Housing Delivery

Source Number of dwellings (net)
Housing completions 2017/18 - 2018/19 661
Housing allocations 2019/20 - 2035/36 6515
Deliverable/developable extant planning permissions above 10 dwellings or more 2019/20 – 2035/36 (Commitments) 2153
Policy H1p: Site Allocations

The following sites are allocated for housing development. The anticipated number of housing units and the amount of development expected to come forward on each site within the plan period are indicative using the minimum density threshold identified in Policy H2p and not intended as a cap on development.

Committed Sites

Local Plan HELA DPD/ Planning Ref. Settlement Site Location Greenfield/ Brownfield Site Area (Ha) Remaining Dwellings
H1C-1p PA/2014/1183 Scunthorpe Plot 29 Hebden Road Brownfield 0.48 14
H1C-2p PA/2017/2006 Scunthorpe Former Crosby Primary School, Frodingham Road Brownfield 0.51 24
H1C-3p PA/2018/2186 Scunthorpe Woods along scotter road Greenfield 2.98 36
H1C-4p PA/2007/0106 Scunthorpe 30-32 Crosby Road Brownfield 0.24 18
H1C-5P PA/2018/999 Scunthorpe Part of Advance Crosby Scheme Phase 2 Brownfield 0.36 22
H1C-6p PA/2017/1483 Scunthorpe Methodist Church Frodingham Road Brownfield 0.12 14
H1C-7p PA/2017/1070 Scunthorpe Land at 1-3 Cliff Gardens Phase1 Brownfield 0.22 14
H1C-8p PA/2018/664 Scunthorpe Land at 1-3 Cliff Gardens Phase 2 Greenfield 0.2 10
H1C-9P SCUH-C3 (PA/2018/136) Scunthorpe Former Tennis Courts Rowland Road Greenfield 0.65 32
H1C-10p PA/2018/217 Scunthorpe Holgate Road Brownfield 0.23 16
H1C-11p SCUH-C2( PA/2015/1369 and (PA/2017) Scunthorpe Brumby Resource Centre, East Common Lane Brownfield 2.03 122
H1C-12p PA/2018/1247 Scunthorpe Land North of Ancholme Road Brownfield 0.24 13
H1C-13p PA/2003/0962 Scunthorpe Lakeside Greenfield 37.91 206
H1C-14p PA/2018/838 Scunthorpe land south of Ashby Turn Primary Care Centre, The Link Greenfield 0.26 18
H1C-15p PA/2018/2004 Scunthorpe Land Rear, Ashby Link, The Link, Scunthorpe, DN16 2US Greenfield 0.3 10
H1C-16p SCUH-12 (PA/2017/200) Scunthorpe Former Carpark, Collum Avenue Brownfield 0.16 14
H1C-17p 2017/1399 Scunthorpe Land off Bottesford Road Brownfield 0.16 10
H1C-18p SCUH-13 (PA/2015/072) Scunthorpe Former Darby Glass Offices and Factory, Sunningdale Road Brownfield 1.71 60
H1C-19p PA/2018/1021 Scunthorpe Site of the Lilcas Warwick Road Brownfield 0.50 25
H1C-20p SCUH-5 (PA/2017/213) Scunthorpe Land off Burringham Road Greenfield 2.49 85
H1C-21p PA/2018/1541 Scunthorpe Former Site Of The Star, Rochdale Road, Scunthorpe, Brownfield 0.24 16
H1C-22p PA/2018/2266 Scunthorpe Former Priory Lane Infants School Greenfield 0.89 36
H1C-23p SCUH-14 (PA/2015/153) Scunthorpe Redevelopment of Westcliff Precinct Brownfield 2.3 31
H1C-24p SCUH-C8 (PA/2018/240) Scunthorpe Land at Dartmouth Road Greenfield 2.49 77
H1C-25p PA/2016/1601 Scunthorpe Cottage Beck Road, Albert Marson Court Brownfield 0.54 27
H1C-26p PA/2018/483 Scunthorpe Land at Dragonby Road Brownfield 0.44 14
H1C-27P PA/2018/1049 Barton Land to the rear of 13-19 Pasture Road Brownfield 0.35 16
H1C-28p PA/2016/1763 Barton Coach and Horses Inn 86 - 88 High Street, Barton Brownfield 0.34 18
H1C-29p PA/2018/1118 Barton Land adjacent to the White Swan Public House Brownfield 0.16 5
H1C-30p PA/2018/897 Barton The Laurels, Preston Lane Brownfield 0.16 5
H1C-31p PA/2017/1109 Barton 7a, Marsh Lane Brownfield 0.15 5
H1C-32p PA/2017/1046 Barton Bank House, 8 Holydyke Brownfield 0.07 5
H1C-33p PA/2016/1611 Brigg Station Road Brownfield 0.82 40
H1C-34p PA/2014/0887 Brigg Island Carr Brownfield 1.88 60
H1C-35p PA/2017/1234 Brigg Falcon Cycles, Bridge Street, Brigg, DN20 8NQ Brownfield 2.2 67
H1C-36p PA/2004/0692 Brigg Silversides Lane Brownfield 1.57 44
H1C-37p PA/2018/510 Barnetby le Wold Land at Windsor Way Greenfield 0.4 9
H1C-38p PA/2017/1989 Barnetby le Wold Site Of Former The Railway Inn Brownfield 0.15 6
H1C-39p PA/2019/752 Barnetby le Wold Railway Inn Phase 2 Brownfield 0.23 8
H1C-40p PA/2018/2316 Broughton Land at Burnside Greenfield 0.5 10
H1C-41p PA/2019/936 Crowle Land adjacent 28 North Street Greenfield 0.26 8
H1C-42p PA/2018/1259 Crowle Land adjacent to 17 Low Cross Street Greenfield 0.39 9
H1C-43p PA/2018/33 Crowle Land off Church Street, Crowle, DN17 4LE Greenfield 0.26 7
H1C-44p PA/2018/1391 Crowle Manor House, Church Street Greenfield 0.12 5
H1C-45p PA/2018/1581 Goxhill land off Howe Lane and Hawthorne Gardens, Goxhill Greenfield 3.35 84
H1C-46p PA/2016/337 Kirton in Lindsey Gleadells Mill Station Road Brownfield 0.82 27
H1C-47p KIRH-(PA/2017/389) Kirton in Lindsey Land west of Station Road Greenfield 2.91 91
H1C-48p KIRH-2 (PA/2016/1704) Kirton in Lindsey Land at Beechcroft Greenfield 2.49 41
H1C-49p PA/1999/0920 Kirton in Lindsey North of Spa Hill Greenfield 6.52 20
H1C-50p KIRH-3 (PA/2017/1199) Kirton in Lindsey Land at Former RAF Brownfield 14.26 302
H1C-51p PA/2017/511 Kirton in Lindsey Grayingham Road Land adjacent Maple Lea, Gainsborough Road Greenfield 0.49 16
H1C-52p PA/2018/978 Messingham 68 High Street, Messingham Brownfield 0..25 7
H1C-53p PA/2015/1390 Winterton Land to the rear of North Street and Cemetery Road, Greenfield 6.62 135
H1C-54p PA/2013/1256, PA/2016/1710, PA/2017/233 Ealand 7 Lakes Industrial Estate, Crowle Wharf Brownfield 0.8 17
H1C-55p PA/2014/0196 Hibaldstow Willow Farm, East Street Greenfield 1.25 40
H1C-56p PA/2017/464 Keadby Old Railway Sidings, A18 from Althorpe to Gunness Brownfield 0.52 14
H1C-57p PA/2018/1884 Scawby west street Greenfield 0.6 8
H1C-58p PA/2016/805 Scawby 19-23 West Street Greenfield 0.38 5
H1C-59p PA/2017/2080 Ulceby Land north of Front Street, Ulceby Greenfield 0.97 14
H1C-60p PA/2017/1450 Ulceby land rear of new convenience store, off Church Lane, Ulceby Brownfield 0.61 9
H1C-61p PA/2019/783 Ulceby Land rear of church lane ulceby Greenfield 0.77 10
H1C-62p PA/2017/674 Wrawby Land off Applefields Greenfield 1.78 22
Total 2153

Proposed Sites

Local Plan HELA DPD/ Planning Ref. Settlement Site Location Greenfield/ Brownfield Site Area (Ha) Potential Dwelling Capacity
SSH1p, SSH2p Lincolnshire Lakes (PA/2013/1000 and PA/2013/1001) Scunthorpe West of Scunthorpe Greenfield 1000 3000
H1P-1p SCUH-1 (PA/2015/0246) Scunthorpe Phoenix Parkway Phase 1 Greenfield 7.96 246
H1P-2p SCUH-2 Scunthorpe Phoenix Parkway Phase 2 Greenfield 1.88 56
H1P-3p SCUH-11 Scunthorpe Land at the Council Depot, Station Road Brownfield 1 38
H1P-4p SCUH-C7 Scunthorpe Land at former South Leys School , Enderby Road Greenfield 3.27 120
H1P-5p BARH-1 & BARH-2 Barton Pasture Road South Greenfield 21.4 199
H1P-6p Barton Land off Barrow Road Greenfield 6 200
H1P-7p Barton Land to the South of Barrow Road Greenfield 6.5 213
H1P-8p Barton Land at Caistor Road Greenfield 13.91 360
H1P-9p Barton Land between Caistor Road and Eastfield Road Greenfield 2.71 98
H1P-10p BRIH-1 & BRIH-5 Brigg Land north of Atherton Way Brownfield 4.4 149
H1P-11p BRIH-2 Brigg Land at Western Avenue Greenfield 5.54 186
H1P-12p BRIH-3 Brigg Wrawby Road Phase 2 Greenfield 11.97 333
H1P-13p BRIH-4 Brigg Wrawby Road Phase 1 Greenfield 4.31 152
H1P-14p Barnetby le Wold Land at King`s Road Land Greenfield 2.38 74
H1P-15p PA/2018/845 Barrow upon Humber Former Spencer Group Mill Lane Brownfield 1.56 50
H1P-16p Barrow upon Humber Land off Ferry Road/Chestnut Rise Greenfield 1.8 59
H1P-17p Barrow upon Humber Land off Ferry Road Greenfield 1.65 54
H1P-18p Broughton Land off the B1207 Greenfield 2.4 74
H1P-19p CROH-1 Crowle Land to the east of Fieldside Brownfield 2.8 101
H1P-20p Crowle Land off Mill Road Greenfield 1.05 57
H1P-21p Crowle Land off Fieldside Greenfield 0.5 20
H1P-22p Epworth Yealand Flats Greenfield 2.63 92
H1P-23p Haxey Land at Field House Brownfield/ Greenfield 2.96 84
H1P-24p Messingham Land to the North of Brigg Road Greenfield 4.67 92
H1P-25p Winterton Land at Top Road Greenfield 2.9 83
H1P-26p Burton upon Stather Land off Darby Road Greenfield 2.31 63
H1P-27p Ealand Land adjacent to Ivy House Farm, on Main street. Greenfield 1 21
H1P-28p East Halton Land off Mill Lane Greenfield 1 29
H1P-29p Hibaldstow Land to the West of Station Road Greenfield 4.2 48
H1P-30p New Holland Land at Manchester Square Greenfield 0.35 11
H1P-31p Scawby Land south of Main Street Greenfield 0.79 11
H1P-32p South Killingholme Land at School Road Brownfield 0.69 21
H1P-33p Ulceby Land east of Brocklesby Road Greenfield 1.71 49
H1P-34p Westwoodside Land south of Doncaster Road Greenfield 0.97 29
H1P-35p Wrawby Land off Melton Road Greenfield 1 30
H1P-36p Wroot Land at Field Lane Greenfield 0.43 11
Total 6515
Alternatives Considered

The following options were considered during the Issues and Options Stage: Option A: Seek to take forward existing unimplemented housing land allocations to meet the housing needs. A number of the housing allocations have developer interest and are likely to come forward for development. Some of the sites may take longer to deliver due to viability issues.

Both options have been carried forward within the preferred options document.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Total residential net completions 419
Maintain a 5 year supply of land for housing Annual Update
Question H1p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H1p: Site Allocations is the right approach? (Please include site reference e.g. H1-1p)

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Housing Mix and Density

The Local Plan aims to ensure new housing provided in North Lincolnshire over the next 20 years best meets the changing needs of the population. An appropriate mix of housing is necessary to secure mixed and balanced communities where people’s needs and aspirations for new housing are met. Housing mix refers to both the size of the property (number of bedrooms) and the type of housing, whether detached, semi, terraced, apartments including adaptive and accessible properties.

North Lincolnshire’s Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 identifies that area has a significantly higher proportion of detached and semi-detached properties compared to the region and England as a whole. It is expected that the future household size within North Lincolnshire will decrease over the next 20 years and this will push up the demand for smaller properties within the area. It is anticipated that there will be a continuing market for family/executive homes, but the existing stock is expected to make a significant contribution to meeting this demand as retirement aged people downsize for a number of reasons including release of equity from existing homes and health reasons. Delivery of smaller properties within North Lincolnshire will support the needs and home ownership aspiration of the younger generation for example by providing starter homes within all new developments and other intermediate home ownership products.

As part of the Local Housing Needs Assessment, the council have modelled the future housing mix requirements by assessing the number of bedrooms future households will require within the plan period. The modelling has used Census data by age and the ratio of rooms to age and projected this forward. Assumptions have been made that the proportion of households by age will want the same number of bedrooms in the future as they did in 2011. On the basis of these factors the following mix of market housing is recommended.

Table 2: Bedroom Mix

Bedrooms Proportion of bedrooms required (%)
1 bedroom 8.0
2 bedrooms 22.5
3 bedrooms 53.1
4+ bedrooms 16.4

The mix and type of dwellings will be assessed against the proportions set out in Policy H2p below as informed by the recommendation of the Local Housing Needs Assessment and any future updates.

Housing Density

The increased demand for new homes is putting development land under pressure. In order to maximise the use of available sites and reduce the pressure on greenfield land, priority will be to reuse previously developed land.

In recent years North Lincolnshire has seen housing development with densities between 35-45 dwellings per hectare depending on its location and the nature of the site in question. These sites have included a variety of housing types for example family homes, apartments and town houses. These densities were set using evidence from the North Lincolnshire SHELAA which identified the dwelling densities that had been achieved within North Lincolnshire over the past 10 years on a variety of sites sizes and locations.

Policy H2p: Housing Mix and Density

All housing schemes should deliver a mix of house types, tenures and size to balance the current housing offer. The precise mix should take account of the following:

  • Market conditions
  • Housing needs and economic viability
  • Sites specific circumstances (size, character, setting)
  • The North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 Housing Mix information set out in Table 2 or in any future updates of the housing mix evidence.

New housing development should make effective use of land and be built at a density appropriate to the character, location and setting of the area and should support the development of sustainable, balanced communities.

Depending on the location of the development, the following net density ranges should be achieved:

  • Scunthorpe town centre: 45-70 dwellings per hectare.
  • Within Scunthorpe Urban Area: 40-45 dwellings per hectare.
  • Strategic Site Allocation – Lincolnshire Lakes: 30-35 dwellings per hectare.
  • Principal Towns: 40-45 dwellings per hectare.
  • Larger Service Centre: 30-40 dwellings per hectare.
  • Larger Rural Settlements, Smaller Rural Settlements, Rural Hamlets and Villages and in the Open Countryside: 30-35 dwellings per hectare.

Policy H2p provides a range of housing density depending on the location of the development. The density ranges have been developed taking account of the densities achieved in North Lincolnshire over the past 10 years. The SHELAA gave an indication of the dwelling densities that have been achieved over the past ten years on a variety of site sizes and locations within North Lincolnshire. It identified that the net densities set out in Policy H2p had been achieved.

NPPF requires the council to plan for a mix of homes of different sizes and types to meet the needs and demands of the current and future population for North Lincolnshire based on the findings of the Local Housing Needs Assessment.

Alternatives Considered

Policy H2p is a combination of both options considered at the Issues and Options Stage which uses the Local Housing Needs Assessment and specific circumstances to ensure that local housing needs are met. Alternative approaches to housing density have been considered which included setting a density requirement within each site allocation, locational based policy and on a site by site basis.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Net additional dwellings approved and completed by no. of bedrooms 419 per annum
Percentage of new dwellings completed at:
  • Less than 35 dwellings per hectare (low density);
  • Between 35 and 45 dwellings per hectare (medium density); and
  • Above 45 dwellings per hectare (high density).
Scunthorpe town centre: 45-70 dwellings per hectare.
  • Within Scunthorpe Urban Area: 40-45 dwellings per hectare.
  • Principal Towns: 40-45 dwellings per hectare.
  • Larger Service Centre: 30-40 dwellings per hectare.
  • Larger Rural Settlements, Smaller Rural Settlements, Rural Hamlets and Villages and in the Open Countryside: 30-35 dwellings per hectare.
Question H2p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H2p: Housing Mix and Density is the right approach?

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Affordable Housing & the Needs of Different Groups

Achieving a good supply and range of high quality affordable homes across North Lincolnshire will provide choice for those in housing need and help to deliver balanced, sustainable communities. Both open market house builders and Registered Providers of social housing will be required to contribute to the delivery of affordable homes to ensure that affordable products are delivered to meet North Lincolnshire housing needs.

Affordable housing as defined in the NPPF, includes social rented, affordable rented and intermediate tenure types, provided for eligible households whose needs are not met by the market.

In accordance with NPPF, the council is seeking through the provision, distribution and design of affordable homes to create sustainable, inclusive and mixed communities. Of particular importance is the need to ensure that within any scheme the affordable homes are integrated and evenly distributed throughout the site (otherwise known as ‘pepper potting’), in order to promote mixed and balanced communities. This will be an important factor of the overall design of the development of a site.

The aim of the affordable housing policy will be to deliver as many affordable homes as possible in order to meet our needs without compromising overall housing delivery. The North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 now identifies an affordable housing need of 156 homes per year and indicates the tenure should be split 31% intermediate products and 69% social products. The average delivery of affordable housing within North Lincolnshire over the past 5 years has been 91 units, with the highest year being 133 units and the lowest being 59 units. This figure includes a range of affordable products including Market Discount Sale, Help to Buy and Home Buy, Shared Ownership and Affordable Rent.

The council has identified that the provision of affordable housing is a priority, however it is recognised that site and market conditions can vary both between sites and in certain circumstances, particularly where abnormal costs or other circumstances apply. It is possible that there may be viability issues on specific sites therefore the council will undertake a detailed assessment of viability through a whole plan viability study which will be completed prior to the Submission Draft Version of the Local Plan. This will enable the council to set realistic targets for delivery of affordable housing which do not threaten the delivery of housing and will include an assessment of the impacts of other policy and infrastructure requirements included within the plan. Also additional negotiations will take place on sites where specific circumstances indicate viability issues to ensure that a proportion of affordable housing is delivered without stalling the delivery of the development. The target levels for affordable housing will also consider past delivery and market values.

The Local Plan Preferred Options Policy uses the same approach as the Core Strategy Affordable Housing Policy which sets a target of 20% within the Scunthorpe and the Market Towns and 10% within the Rural Settlements on all major housing development. Since the Core Strategy was adopted, the council have been able to secure up to 20% affordable housing on all major housing development schemes. In the circumstances were the target has been reduced, a full financial viability assessment have been submitted as part of the planning application. The council has reviewed that appraisal and been able to secure a smaller contribution if the scheme is unviable to deliver the full affordable housing contribution.

The provision of affordable housing on-site as part of a wider housing development supports the creation of sustainable, inclusive and mixed communities. There may however, be some circumstance in which it may be appropriate to provide affordable housing off-site, examples might include: development that only delivers small amounts of affordable housing which would be difficult for Registered Providers to manage or where an off-site contribution would provide more affordable housing elsewhere to meet local needs.

Rural Exception Sites

Another way of delivering affordable housing within North Lincolnshire is through a rural exception sites policy. This is usually where land adjacent to existing settlements, but outside of the development limits, is utilised to provide additional affordable housing on land that would not usually be promoted for development. The use of exception sites has been successful in delivering additional affordable housing within North Lincolnshire over the past 10 years.

This type of provision is mainly reliant on external grant investment that in some circumstances is not readily available. National Planning Policy now allows local planning authorities to consider whether allowing some market housing would facilitate the provision of significant additional affordable housing to meet local needs.

Policy H3p: Affordable Housing

New residential housing development of 10 or more dwellings in North Lincolnshire must make provision for an element of affordable housing which is accessible to those unable to compete in the open housing market.

This policy seeks to achieve the following proportion of affordable housing:

  • Major Sub-Regional Centre, Principal Towns and Larger Service Centres 20%
  • Larger Rural Settlements, Smaller Rural Settlements 10%

A target of 69% of the affordable homes will be provided for rent, with the remaining provided as an intermediate tenure, to be agreed on a site by site basis.

At least 10% of the affordable homes should be available for affordable home ownership, unless this would exceed the level of affordable housing required in the area, or significantly prejudice the ability to meet the identified affordable housing needs of specific groups. Exemptions to this 10% requirement will be made where the site or proposed development:

  1. Provides solely for Build to Rent homes;
  2. Provides specialist accommodation for a group of people with specific needs (such as purpose-built accommodation for the elderly or students);
  3. Is proposed to be developed by people who wish to build or commission their own homes; or
  4. Is exclusively for affordable housing, an entry-level exception site or a rural exception site.

Development of affordable housing should be:

  1. Provided on-site in order to help achieve mixed and balanced communities. However, off-site provision or a financial contribution made in lieu maybe considered acceptable where it can be robustly justified.
  2. Retained in affordable use in perpetuity; and
  3. Provided to the same design and building standard as the market housing and be pepper-potted throughout the site.
  4. 5% of the affordable housing component of every housing development providing or capable of acceptably providing 5 or more self-contained affordable homes, should meet Building Regulations requirement M4 (3) ‘wheelchair user dwellings’ to be wheelchair accessible, or be easily adapted for residents who are wheelchair users.

Where it can be demonstrated that the percentage of affordable housing sought will negatively impact on the delivery of a mixed community, or are subject to exceptional and authenticated site development costs, there may be a case for reducing the affordable housing. This should be proven through open book discussions with the council at planning application stage.

Rural Exception Sites

Planning permission will be granted for the release of small rural exception sites within or adjacent to the development limits or within rural settlements for 100% affordable housing where a local need has been clearly identified. All proposals must be substantiated by evidence that the scale of development proposed meets the identified needs.

Housing on Rural Exceptions Sites shall remain ‘affordable’ in perpetuity to continue to meet local need. In some circumstances (most likely due to viability), it will be acceptable to provide an element of market housing on rural exception sites, to cross subsidise the affordable housing.

Specialist housing

Planning permission will be granted for the development of specialist housing, subject to the development being:

  1. Supported by evidence of the demonstrable need for this form of development within North Lincolnshire;
  2. Suitable for the intended occupiers in relation to the quality and type of facilities, and the provision of support and/or care;
  3. It is unlikely to cause unacceptable impact on the residential amenity;
  4. Appropriate measures will be in place to ensure access for emergency vehicles and safety measures such as fire escapes;
  5. Satisfactory outside space, highway access, parking and servicing can be achieved;
  6. Accessible to local shops and services, public transport and other sustainable modes of transport, and community facilities appropriate to the needs of the intended occupiers; and
  7. In a location that avoids excessive concentration of such housing within any one street or small area.

Policy H3p sets out the council’s approach for the delivery of affordable housing as part of major housing developments comprising of 10 dwellings or more. The affordable housing requirements set out within the policy reflects current and future housing requirements in North Lincolnshire informed by the North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019.

The council recognises that the full affordable housing requirement identified within the North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 will not be met by policy H3p. This is due to some of the sites being located within a lower cost market area and or the site has a number of abnormal costs associated with it that makes the viability difficult. The policy is therefore flexible enough to ensure that in these circumstances, the council can agree a lower affordable housing requirement to ensure deliverability of a scheme. In such circumstances the applicant will be expected to submit a detailed viability assessment to clearly demonstrate how the affordable housing requirement set out within Policy H3p would make the scheme unviable. Where the council accepts that a lower proportion of affordable housing would be appropriate on viability grounds, the applicant will be expected to deliver the maximum level of affordable housing possible.

Affordable housing will be secured by a Section 106 legal agreement to ensure, where applicable, the provision remains affordable indefinitely. It is the council’s preference for affordable housing to be transferred by the developer to a Registered Provider working as one of the council’s partners.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives were considered as both options in the Issues and Options were in accordance with the NPPF.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Annual number of Affordable Homes delivered within North Lincolnshire 84 dwellings per annum
Number of Rural Exception Sites Completed The number of Rural Exception dwellings completed in settlements with an identified affordable housing need
Question H3p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H3p: Affordable Housing is the right approach?

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Housing for Older People

North Lincolnshire has an aging population, over the next 20 years (2016-2036) the resident population aged 65-84 years is predicted to increase by 35% (from 30,554 to 41,108). The resident population aged 85+years is also anticipated to increase by 126% (from 4,360 to 9,866). This represents a significant demographic shift which gives rise to a range of housing issues affecting both older people and the housing market as a whole. It is therefore essential that a policy is established to ensure that the needs of older people are met over the plan period. The plan aims to give all adults that require provision of care more choice and control over where and how they live and receive care.

An estimated 70% of those aged 85+ have at least one chronic long term condition and 20% have at least three conditions, including almost 1 in 5 with dementia.

Most of the housing built within North Lincolnshire over the past 20 years has been built for families with a small amount aimed at older people. There are a number of housing options which older people may consider, including retirement villages, building smaller properties which have the ability to be easily adapted to meet future care and support needs, bungalows, larger multi-generational housing like sheltered accommodation and extra care which has 24 hour care available.

The Housing LIN for North Lincolnshire commission on behalf of the Greater Lincolnshire LEP identified that North Lincolnshire’s current provision for older people social rented accommodation and residential care is significantly above national average. Private sector retirement housing, housing with care and Nursing Care are significantly below the national average.

Providing housing to meet the needs of the older population has a number of benefits including freeing up larger family homes, making limited mortgage lending go further, potentially free up hospital beds if older patients have suitable housing to return to and addressing fuel poverty.

In addition to measures to enable more people to live independently for longer in their existing homes, the council is currently working with the North East Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group and other partners to develop Extra Care Housing schemes. This type of housing is considered to be an attractive alternative to traditional residential care. It allows couples to remain together, and allows people to retain their own front door and independent address whilst having easy access to the care and support they will need to keep healthy and continue living independently. The Extra Care Housing being developed is for frailer older people, or for those with Dementia. The homes are being built to high standards.

Policy H4p: Housing for Older People
  1. The council will support the provision of housing that maximises independence and choice for older people and other people with specific needs. When assessing the suitability of sites and/or proposals for the development of residential care homes, extra care housing and continuing care retirement communities, the council will have regard to the following:
    • the local need for the accommodation proposed using the North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 and any future updates;
    • the ability of future residents to access essential services, including public transport, GP Surgeries and shops;
    • whether the proposal would result in an undue concentration of such provision in the area; and
    • impact upon the local environment and the character of the area.
  2. All new specialist homes designed for older people shall be built to M4 (2) of the Building Regulations, (or subsequent replacements), as a minimum.
  3. In addition to the provision of specialist accommodation, the council aims to ensure that older people are able to secure and sustain ongoing independence either in their own homes or with the support of family members. To enable this, the council will:
    1. Encourage the incorporation of adaptable features within all new residential development to meet household needs over time; and
    2. On large strategic sites developers will be required to deliver specific provision to meet older people’s needs including bungalows, level access flats and supported homes.
    3. Support evidence based proposals for self-contained annexes and extensions to existing dwellings in order to accommodate, for example, an elderly or disabled dependent.
    4. A proportion of the following sites allocations will be allocated for older people:

    Committed Sites

    Local Plan HELA DPD/ Planning Ref. Settlement Site Location Greenfield/ Brownfield Site Area (Ha) Number of dwellings allocated for Older People
    H1C-11p SCUH-C2( PA/2015/1369 and (PA/2017) Scunthorpe Brumby Resource Centre, East Common Lane Brownfield 2.03 30
    H1C-19p SCUH-C7 (PA/2015/1101) Scunthorpe Land at former South Leys School, Enderby Road Greenfield 3.27 40
    H1C-28p PA/2016/1611 Brigg Station Road Brownfield 0.82 40

    Proposed Sites

    Local Plan HELA DPD/ Planning Ref. Settlement Site Location Greenfield/ Brownfield Site Area (Ha) Potential Dwelling Capacity
    SSH1p, SSH2p Lincolnshire Lakes (PA/2013/1000 and PA/2013/1001) Scunthorpe West of Scunthorpe Greenfield 1000.00 100
    H1P-2p SCUH-2 Scunthorpe Phoenix Parkway Phase 2 Greenfield 1.88 10
    H1P-13p Barnetby le Wold Land at King`s Road Land Greenfield 2.80 20
    H1P-22p Epworth Yealand Flats Greenfield 2.63 20
  4. Proposals for a self-contained annex should accommodate the functional need of the occupant(s), be proportionate in scale and remain ancillary to the main dwelling throughout the lifetime of its occupancy.
  5. Where appropriate, the council will consider the use of planning conditions to restrict occupancy and subsequent sale.

North Lincolnshire has an aging population and the future housing needs will require changes to the types and mix of housing that is delivered. With a pattern of lower birth rates, smaller families, increased divorce and increasing mobility many people will continue to face old age on their own. This can result in increased pressure on social care if homes cannot be adapted to meet the needs of older occupiers. Simple adaptations can extend the flexibility of homes to meet changing household needs over time. There will still be a growing requirement for more specialist homes as well to maximise independence.

Policy H4p Housing for Older People aims to support North Lincolnshire’s aging population to live independently in their own homes, with support from family members or specialist housing. All planning permission granted for self – contained annexes will be conditioned to restrict occupancy and subsequent sales where amenity issues could arise if the annex were to be split from the main dwelling and serve as an independent dwelling. This could be due to the loss of privacy, access and parking or the nature of the constriction of the annex.

The Government has introduced a new system of standards for new housing, rationalising many differed previous standards. Mandatory Building Regulations covering the physical security of new dwellings came into force in October 2015. The council will require all new housing specifically for older people to be built in accordance with Part MM4 (2) OR M4 (3) of the Building Regulations that has been expanded to include new enhanced levels of accessibility.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives considered as both options in the Issues and Option were in accordance with the NPPF.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of approved and completed housing units that meet the specific needs of older People by tenure type 100%
Question H4p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H4p: Housing for Older People is the right approach?

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North Lincolnshire Travelling Communities

The definitions for Gypsies and Travellers vary across legislation. The definition used in Planning Policy for Traveller Sites (PPT) is: “Persons of nomadic habit of life whatever their race or origin, including such persons who on grounds only of their own or their family’s or dependants’ educational or health needs or old age have ceased to travel temporarily or permanently but excluding members of an organised group of travelling showpeople or circus people travelling together as such”. National planning policy also states “travelling showpeople”. This means: Members of a group organised for the purposes of holding fairs, circuses or shows (whether or not travelling together as such). This includes such persons who on the grounds of their own or their family’s or dependants’ more localised pattern of trading, educational or health needs or old age have ceased to travel temporarily, but excludes Gypsies and Travellers as defined above.

The PPT also requires all local planning authorities to set targets for new pitches and plots. Local authorities must also identify and maintain a five year supply of sites in order to meet their target for both new and permanent residential and transit pitches.

Gypsies and Travellers live on pitches located in permanent authorised sites either provided by local authorities or privately owned. Pitches are large enough to accommodate a single static caravan and touring caravan. They often also have a day room, with water and electric supply, to provide utility washing and bathroom facilities.

Transit sites are authorised sites which are used for short stays by Gypsies and Travellers. The sites are provided on a permanent basis and have basic amenities and services, which include water supply, shared toilets, washing facilities/utility room and waste disposal.

North Lincolnshire Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment 2017 provides an objective assessment of future pitch requirement for Gypsy and Travellers including Travelling Showpeople in accordance with national policy. The assessment identifies that North Lincolnshire needs to find provision for 10 permanent residential pitches and 13 transit pitches. Currently North Lincolnshire has two locations (Brigg and Kirton in Lindsey) providing permanent Gypsy and Travellers facilities. The two Brigg sites River View and Mill View currently have additional capacity to meet the future additional needs with the scope for future expansion.

Policy H5p: North Lincolnshire’s Travelling Communities

The assessed accommodation needs of Gypsies and Travellers and Travelling Show People should be met on existing sites/ yards with capacity in North Lincolnshire, and by maintaining a five year supply of sites across the Plan period as set out in the Policies Map.

In determining proposals for new sites to accommodate Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople, consideration will be given to whether:

  1. there is a proven identified need for the scale and nature of the development proposed which supports the development of, or extension to an existing Gypsy, Traveller or Showpeople site;
  2. the development is sensitive to the character and appearance of the landscape and the amenity of neighbouring properties;
  3. the site has safe and satisfactory vehicular and pedestrian and cycle access for the type of vehicles that could reasonably be expected to use or access the site;
  4. there are no significant constraints to development in terms of flood risk, poor drainage, land contamination, or environmental impacts;
  5. the site is suitable with regard to accessing local services and amenities; and,
  6. the site can be properly serviced and supplied with essential infrastructure, including water, power, sewerage, drainage and waste disposal;
  7. the site provides adequate space for vehicle parking, turning and servicing of large vehicles, storage, play and residential amenity.

National Planning Policy requires all councils to provide a criteria based policy in local plans. This will be used in the assessment of developments to address identified needs and any applications that may come forward over the plan period. The sites at Brigg have the capacity to accommodate future need and the land adjacent to these sites will be safeguarded and identified on the Policies Map.

Alternatives Considered

The following options were considered during the Issues and Options stage:

  • Option A: Seek to allocate sites as part of residential allocations.
  • Options B: Seek to allocate sites specifically for Gypsies and Travellers and travelling show people.

During the consultation Option B was the supported option and this approach complies with PPT.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Total number of pitches available
New pitches and plots approved and provided per annum (allocations & windfall development) 10 permanent residential pitches and 13 transit pitches.
Question H5p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H5p: North Lincolnshire’s Travelling Communities is the right approach?

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Agricultural and Rural Workers’ Dwellings

To support farm and other businesses appropriate to rural areas, the council will permit new dwellings for rural workers where it is essential. The council will need to clearly establish whether the requirement for a new dwelling is genuine, whether it can be met by an existing dwelling on the holding or through the conversion of a building. Where a need for a new dwelling is successfully demonstrated, consent will be conditional on the dwelling remaining for occupation by a rural worker in perpetuity.

NPPF at Paragraph 79 aims to avoid the development of isolated homes in the open countryside unless the development is essential for rural workers including taking majority control of a farm business.

The council has previously successfully used the now revoked national policy set out in Annex I of Planning Policy Statement 7: Sustainable Development in Rural Areas to determine the criteria for assessing housing development for use by rural enterprise workers. In the absence of new guidance from the Government following the publication of the NPPF, the council will continue to use similar criteria.

Policy H6p: New Agricultural Workers or Forestry Dwellings

In the open countryside outside of the Development Limits, the erection of new dwellings in connection with a farm or other rural business will only be allowed where it satisfies other relevant policies of the Plan and meets all of the following criteria:

  1. The applicant demonstrates that there is no other viable option of utilising the following types of accommodation:
    1. Existing vacant dwellings in the nearest settlements or vacant agricultural buildings closer to the site than the nearest settlements; or
    2. Conversion of an existing building to the holding to residential uses; or
    3. The rearrangement, sub division or extension of existing dwellings; or
    4. Any viable options for the refurbishment of a derelict or under-used dwelling on the holding or in the locality; or
    5. Extant residential permission in the locality.
  2. Evidence has been submitted to the satisfaction of the council that there is an existing functional need for a permanent dwelling in the particular location;
    1. The need relates to a full-time worker or one who is primarily employed in agriculture or another rural-based enterprise considered acceptable by the council;
    2. The unit and the agricultural/rural activity concerned has been established for at least three years, has been profitable for at least one of them, is currently financially sound, and has a clear prospect of remaining so;
  3. The size of, and the accommodation to be included within the proposed dwelling, is appropriate with the needs of the enterprise rather than those of the owner or occupier and is well designed and located within, or adjacent to, the existing building on the holding;
    1. The occupation of the dwelling shall be restricted to a person solely or mainly working, or last working, in the locality in agriculture or in forestry, or a widow or widower of such a person, and to any resident dependants.
    2. Where necessary, an agreement or obligation will be entered into between North Lincolnshire Council and the applicant in order to tie the occupancy of the dwelling to the related operation; and
    3. The external appearance and materials reflect local building traditions and the means of access is acceptable.

Policy H6p provides additional policy criteria to ensure the erection of a new dwelling within the open countryside is essential to the development of a farm or forestry business.

Alternatives Considered

There were no options for development in the countryside, however reference was made in the other options. NPPF Paragraph 79 aims to avoid the development of isolated homes in the open countryside unless the development is an essential need for rural workers including taking majority control of a farm business.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
No of dwellings approved within the open countryside per annum No specific target identified
Question H6p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H6p: New Agricultural Workers or Forestry Dwellings is the right approach?

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Policy H7p: Replacement, Alteration and Extensions to Dwellings in the Open Countryside

Proposals to replace, extend or alter dwellings in the open countryside will only be permitted provided that:

  1. the replacement dwelling would not exceed the volume of the original dwelling, which it is to replace, by the volume that can be developed under permitted development rights, and would not be substantially higher in elevation;
  2. the volume of the proposed extension or alteration does not exceed that of the original dwelling by 20%, inclusive of the permitted development rights, and the original dwelling forms the dominant visual feature of the dwelling as extended;
  3. all new construction is of a high standard of design and in particular reflects the architecture of the building and/or vernacular styles in the locality; and
  4. the appearance or use of the dwelling as replaced, extended or altered will not adversely affect the amenity of local residents or the appearance of the locality.

This policy is intended to ensure that the replacement of dwellings, and alterations and extensions to existing dwellings in the open countryside are allowed only where absolutely necessary. Any new construction should reflect the style, scale and character of the local architecture. The siting of any replacement dwelling should have regard to the existing layout, character and amenity of the site and surroundings.

It is important that the replacement does not have a detrimental effect upon the character of the area and visual amenity of the countryside and needs to be located where possible to make the best use of existing site features. The planning authority will ensure that development respects and enhances the character of the countryside and will impose landscape conditions on new development in order to ensure the integration of the proposed dwelling with the surrounding landscape.

Buildings that are in ruins, sites of former dwellings and temporary or mobile structures used as dwellings will not be considered as dwellings for the purposes of this policy.

Though it would be normal to condition the removal of the original building as part of the planning permission for a replacement dwelling, consideration should be given to species of wildlife which are protected by law and are often found in old buildings. In such circumstances it may be desirable to retain the original structure and renovate it rather than build a replacement or retain it in non-residential use ancillary to the new dwelling. Where bats and barn owls are present the developer will be required to submit a survey report together with proposals to mitigate and compensate for the effects of demolition and may include restrictions as to the time of year works can be carried out.

Alternatives Considered

There were no options for development in the countryside, however reference was made in the other options.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
% of Householder Planning Appeals dismissed per annum No specific target identified
Question H7p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H7p: Replacement, Alteration and Extensions to Dwellings in the Open Countryside is the right approach?

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Self-Build and Custom Build

The government introduced the Self-Build and Custom Housing Building Act 2015 which aims to support the Self-Build and Custom Build sector and remove the barriers which prevent people from building or commissioning their own homes. The Council encourages the development of Self-Build and Custom Build within North Lincolnshire and recently has implemented a local register for people who want to build their own homes.

The Council will have regard to the register when carrying out their functions in relation to housing, planning, land disposal and regeneration. The number of mortgages available for this product is set to increase substantially. Self-build development is exempt from Community Infrastructure Levy and Section 106 Contributions.

Policy H8p: Self-Build and Custom Build

The Council will support the development of self-build and custom build homes that assist in meeting the overall housing needs.

On allocated sites of more than 200 dwellings, developers will be expected to supply at least 1% of dwelling plots for sale to self-builders taking in account the needs identified on the council’s Self-Build and Custom Build Register.

The council will support locally proposed self-build projects identified within a Neighbourhood Plan wherever possible.

All self-build and custom build development granted planning permission should have a condition requiring the development to be completed within 3 years of the self-builder purchasing a plot.

Where there is evidence that developable plots have been marketed at competitive rates for a period of more than 24 months without interest from self-build or custom builders, those plots may revert to delivery through conventional means.

The Council considers that self-build and custom build housing can play an important part in contributing to the supply of housing, increasing the mix of housing types and tenures, and have the potential to increase the delivery of innovative and highly sustainable developments in a cost effective manner.

Therefore, to support prospective self-builders, developers of sites proposing 200 or more dwellings, will be expected to supply a proportion of serviced dwelling plots for sale to self-builders.

The Localism Act 2011 provides communities with the opportunity to encourage self-build and custom build housing by creating planning policies or allocating new development sites in their area. The Council will support locally proposed self-build projects identified within a Neighbourhood Plan wherever possible.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives have been considered. Both options identified within the Issues and Options have been incorporated into Policy H8p.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Numbers on the self and custom build register No target
Numbers of planning permissions granted which are capable of delivering serviced plots More or equivalent planning permissions granted which are capable of delivering serviced plots than numbers on the self and custom build register
Question H8p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H8p: Self-Build and Custom Build is the right approach?

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Flats above Shops and Vacant Buildings for Housing

The conversion of suitable vacant buildings for housing and other initiatives such as promoting flats above shops can bring new life into towns and further reduce the need for building on greenfield land. Re-using vacant and under-used buildings in towns and urban areas can also reduce the need to travel and do much to stimulate the night-time economy and encourage mixed uses.

Policy H9p: Flats above Shops and the Use of Vacant Buildings for Housing

The use of premises above shops for residential uses will be permitted provided that there is no conflict with existing land uses and that there is adequate access and car parking nearby. Elsewhere the Council will seek to maximise the residential use of both vacant and under-used housing. The conversion of under-used commercial premises in town centres for housing will be permitted provided that there is no conflict with existing land uses, access, parking and the environment.

Flats over shops and the use of other vacant buildings can be a valuable source of new housing. In Scunthorpe, major retail redevelopment of the town centre will provide additional retail and leisure facilities. This is expected to provide a number of opportunities for increasing housing provision from both conversions and re-development in the future in other parts of the town centre. In many other town centres and elsewhere in the Scunthorpe and Bottesford Urban Area there is potential to provide additional housing by re-using vacant buildings and providing flats above shops. The Council will encourage such proposals wherever practicable in order to promote urban renaissance and sustainable living.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives considered

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to Policy H9p None upheld at appeal
Question H9p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H9p: Flats above Shops and the Use of Vacant Buildings for Housing is the right approach?

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Backland development and tandem development

There are many areas of land within the curtilages of properties and premises, behind frontage buildings and away from the highway. Such land is commonly known as backland. Proposals are submitted to the Council for dwellings on these sites which if not carefully located can result in tandem development whereby one house is immediately located behind the other and shares the same narrow access. This can have a significant impact on local distinctiveness and conservation by the erosion of the unique character that makes these places special, particularly if the principles of good design are not taken into account.

Such proposals need to be carefully controlled to prevent problems arising from access, loss of privacy and amenity. It is essential therefore if development takes place in these areas, that it is appropriate in all respects and that it makes a positive contribution to the environment and community within which it is located, having regard to conservation and sustainable design policies to ensure the local distinctiveness and character of these areas is maintained.

Policy H10p: Backland and Tandem Development

Backland development or tandem development will be permitted provided that:

  1. there is no adverse effect on the amenities of any residential premises or adjoining use through:
    1. overlooking and loss of privacy;
    2. loss of amenity area to the adjoining dwellings;
    3. the level of nuisance resulting from the movement of vehicles to and from the proposed development.
  2. it would not affect the general quality and character of the area in which it is located by:
    1. unacceptably increasing the density of development in that area;
    2. resulting in the loss of important natural and man-made features;
    3. leading to an unacceptable proliferation of vehicular accesses to the detriment of the street scene and/or road safety.

The development of back gardens and other backland for new housing should be in keeping with the character and quality of the local environment. Where development of back gardens or backland is allowed, it will require careful planning. For example, there must be proper means of access, which is convenient and safe for both drivers and pedestrians, and adequate provision for vehicle parking and turning. There must be adequate space between old and new buildings to avoid spoiling the amenity of neighbouring houses and overshadowing must be avoided.

Sensitive design and good landscaping are particularly important if new developments are to be accommodated successfully in established residential areas. Tandem development, consisting of one house immediately behind another and sharing the same narrow access, is generally unsatisfactory because of the difficulties of access to the house at the back and the disturbance and lack of privacy suffered by the house in front.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives considered

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to Policy H10p None upheld at appeal
Question H10p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H10p: Backland and Tandem Development is the right approach?

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Houses in Multiple Occupation

The Housing Act 2004 provides a definition of a House in Multiple Occupation (HMO), which, in summary, is a building or part of a building that is rented out by at least 3 people who are not from 1 ‘household’ (e.g. a family) but share some facilities such as a bathroom or kitchen.

HMOs accommodating six or more unrelated individuals are unclassified by the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987, as amended. They are therefore described in planning terms as ‘Sui Generis’ and require planning permission. Policy H11p provides a framework for determining planning applications for HMOs considered as being ‘Sui Generis’.

HMO’s can be associated with student accommodation and single/multiple person accommodation within the private rented sector. Where there is a high density of HMO accommodation this can result in a decline of traditional dwelling houses and a rise in amenity issues for more permanent residents.

HMOs can raise a number of issues and problems, particularly in areas of high concentration, including: parking provision, waste/recycling storage and removal, privacy and visual and residential amenity (particularly in terms of noise generation).

Any significant impact on the surrounding roads and the amenity of future residents and adjoining or neighbouring properties should be minimised. Furthermore, it is important to ensure that development takes place in appropriate locations, avoiding the over-concentration of such properties where the issues above would be proliferated.

NPPF favours development which facilitates the use of sustainable modes of transport. Properties should therefore have good walking and cycling access to key services, facilities and a bus service (by which residents can reach such services and facilities). A distance of 400m is generally accepted as an appropriate walking distance to key services, facilities and public transport from home.

Proposals for the creation of HMOs should provide satisfactory standards of accommodation. One step in achieving this is to ensure that there is adequate living space which complies with DCLG Nationally Described Space Standards March 2015 (or any successor). Furthermore, for some large HMOs, a licence is required. Where this is the case, the proposal should be in accordance with DASH space standards (or any successor).

Where there is evidence to demonstrate an over intensification of HMO’s within North Lincolnshire which is having a detrimental impact upon the character and amenity of the local area, the Council will seek to put in place an Article 4 Direction. In these circumstances the Article 4 Direction would seek to require that a planning application is made to North Lincolnshire Council for the change of use of a building from a dwelling house (Planning Use Class C3) to a small HMO (Planning Use Class C4) by removing existing Permitted Development Rights for dwelling houses to convert to HMO’s without planning approval.

Policy H11p: Houses in Multiple Occupation

Proposals for the creation of large Houses in Multiple Occupation and the sub-division of dwellings will be permitted provided that, in each case:

  1. it would not result in the loss of family-sized dwellings in high density residential areas and streets of predominantly terraced and/or semi-detached properties;
  2. it would not significantly harm the amenities of the occupiers of adjoining or neighbouring properties, by way of noise, overlooking, general disturbance or impact on visual amenity;
  3. it would not have a significant adverse impact on the character and appearance of the area, including the historic and natural environment;
  4. adequate provision is made for the storage and disposal of refuse and recycling;
  5. it would not have a significant adverse impact on the surrounding area by way of increased on-street parking, impaired highway safety or by impeding proper access to the area;
  6. the site has good access – by walking and cycling – to community facilities, services, public transport and local employment;
  7. an adequate standard of residential accommodation and residential amenity is provided for future occupiers; and
  8. adequate provision is made for the communal gardens and amenity areas.

Where all of the above criteria are satisfied, the DCLG Nationally Described Space Standards March 2015 (or any successor) will be applied to ensure that the occupiers have adequate floor space.

Where appropriate for licensing purposes, proposals for the creation of a HMO should be in accordance with DASH Land Lords Guide Amenities and Space in HMO’s (Housing Act Guidance 2004) (or any successor).

HMOs form an important element of North Lincolnshire’s housing stock and can provide a useful low-cost form of accommodation for single persons and those on low incomes. But they can result in the loss of family-sized units and a consequential increase in the overall number of units unsuited to family occupation. This poses serious issues for maintaining a mixed housing offer across North Lincolnshire. The North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 for the Local Plan area signal that the greatest demand in the future will be for single person homes. It is important, therefore, that an approach is taken to the creation of HMO and sub-division of existing properties, which allows only those that do not impact upon the overall supply of family-sized homes. In applying this policy, ‘family-sized dwellings’ means houses with 3 or more bedrooms.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives considered

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of HMOs and flat conversions refused No appeals upheld contrary to Policy H11p
The mix of sizes of housing completed compared with the North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment Annual Update
Question H11p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H11p: Houses in Multiple Occupation is the right approach?

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Children’s Homes

In 2016 the government set out its ambitions and strategy to reform Children’s Social Care. The Government’s vision is that every child in the country, whatever their background, whatever their age, whatever their ethnicity or gender, should have the opportunity to fulfil their potential. For the around 70,000 children who are looked after this means that their experience of care should prepare them for a future where they are able to fulfil their potential and ambitions.

The children and young people living in children’s homes are among the most vulnerable in society. Whilst children's homes have traditionally been for children under 16, provision for young people beyond the age of 16 years old would also be determined against this policy or Addressing Housing Needs. Many have special educational needs or disabilities, including social, educational and mental health difficulties and many are victims of abuse or neglect. It is therefore vital that we do everything possible to improve their experience of being looked after in care, helping them to overcome their previous experiences, and setting them up for futures which allow them to achieve their potential.

In order to understand the issues surrounding supply and demand and to get a national picture of the needs of the children placed on welfare grounds, Government set up a National Coordination Unit in May 2016. With the data gathered by the unit the Government is developing options for how secure places can be better planned, co-ordinated and joined up at national level, to better meet the needs of young people needing secure accommodation.

A Review by Sir Martin Narey suggested that children should be placed within 20 miles from their home. Nationally, 37% of children in children’s homes were placed over 20 miles from home and outside their local authority at 31 March 2015.

In support of any planning application, evidence will need to be provided that the needs will be met in terms of access to any services and facilities and to ensure that any necessary safeguards are put in place including having had regard to any crime or safety concerns of the particular area. A locality risk assessment will be required which is in line with the Care Standards Act and will need to submitted in support of a planning application. This should be undertaken through consultation with relevant organisations including Humberside Police, North Lincolnshire Council Children Services and will be required to also take into account the cumulative impact of any similar establishments in the locality and the impact this could have of emergency services.

In addition to the safeguarding and general needs of the children, consideration must also be given to the existing residents in terms of residential amenity. Any proposals must demonstrate that there will be no unacceptable impact on the character of the area.

Policy H12p: Children's Homes

The development of both new and converted properties for Children Homes will be permitted provided that:

  1. The development is located within either the Scunthorpe and Bottesford Urban Area, Principal Towns, or Larger Service Centre.
  2. Sites offer a positive and safe environment for the occupants of the premises ensuring that there is appropriate access to services and facilities;
  3. The occupants would not be placed at any risk having regard to the latest crime and safety statistics in the area and that this has been agreed in advance with Humberside Police, the Council’s Children's Services and other appropriate agencies;
  4. There is no unacceptable, cumulative impact relating from concentrations of similar establishments within the locality through liaison with the Council Children's Services and any other appropriate agencies;
  5. It is unlikely to cause unacceptable impact on the residential amenity;
  6. Satisfactory outside space, highway access, parking and servicing can be achieved. In all instances, a planning application must be supported by a management plan which incorporates a locality risk assessment, for approval by the Local Planning Authority in consultation with the Council Children's Services and any other appropriate agencies.
  7. Appropriate measures will be in place to ensure access for emergency vehicles and safety measures such as fire escapes

Policy H12p provides additional criteria to support the delivery of Children Homes in the most suitable locations to support the needs of the occupants, staff and local community.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives considered

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to Policy H12p None upheld at appeal
Question H12p

Do you think the Preferred Policy H12p: Children's Homes is the right approach?

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