Chapter Contents

Download

4 A Spatial Strategy for North Lincolnshire

Policy Map

Click below to view the policy map.

Introduction

Creating and delivering sustainable development lies at the heart of the planning system. Therefore, the Local Plan is essential in ensuring the proper planning of North Lincolnshire over the next 19 years. It sets out a clear and co-ordinated approach to the provision of new homes, jobs and supporting infrastructure alongside the need to protect the interests of our communities and the environment.

This means that, when deciding how much growth will take place and where it should be located, the Local Plan must take the issue of sustainability into account, i.e. by looking at and assessing the economic, environmental and social impacts of growth and development on the area.

The Local Plan identifies those locations that are most appropriate to accommodate future growth and development. This takes account of the need to minimise impacts on the environment and make the best use of existing or planned infrastructure. It will also identify areas/locations that could be serviced by new infrastructure or services. This is what is meant by sustainable development that will benefit both existing and future communities in North Lincolnshire.

Delivering Sustainable Development

Government is clear that the role of the planning system, including Local Plans, is to contribute towards the achievement of sustainable development. This seeks to ensure a better quality of life for everyone, both and in the future. The policies of the Local Plan all seek to contribute towards sustainable development in North Lincolnshire.

Policy SS1p: Presumption in Favour of Sustainable Development

Creating and delivering sustainable growth lies at the heart of the spatial strategy for North Lincolnshire, with all new development contributing towards sustainable development. When considering development proposals the council will take a positive approach that reflects the presumption in favour of sustainable development contained in the National Planning Policy Framework.

  1. The council will work proactively with applicants jointly to find solutions which mean that proposals can be approved, wherever possible, and to secure development that improves the economic, social and environmental conditions in North Lincolnshire.
  2. Planning applications that accord with the policies in this Local Plan (and, where relevant, with policies in Neighbourhood Plans) will be approved without delay, unless material considerations indicate otherwise.
  3. Where there are no policies relevant to the application or relevant policies are out of date at the time of making the decision then the council will grant permission unless material considerations indicate otherwise taking into account whether:
    1. Any adverse impacts significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the NPPF, taken as a whole; or
    2. Specific policies in the NPPF or Local Plan indicate that development should be restricted.

The presumption in favour of sustainable development is at the heart of the NPPF. It is a “golden thread” running through this Local Plan and future planning decisions that stem from it. Local Plan policies must plan positively to meet North Lincolnshire’s objectively assessed development needs, including for housing, employment and infrastructure. The plan also needs to be sufficiently flexible to deal with any changes or challenges that may arise.

Including a policy on the presumption in favour of sustainable development allows the council to approve appropriate development without delay in accordance with the NPPF. The presumption in favour of sustainable development will not apply where the adverse impacts of granting planning permission would be significantly outweighed by the benefits of the scheme, or where specific policies within the NPPF or Local Plan indicate that development will be restricted. Therefore, this policy should be read in conjunction with other relevant policies of this Local Plan.

Alternatives Considered

This policy translates the NPPF “presumption in favour of sustainable development” and ensures that the achievement of sustainable development is a golden thread running through the Local Plan, to ensure consistency with the NPPF. No reasonable alternative options were previously considered.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
GVA Per Head Increase in GVA Per Head
Overall population growth Increase in overall population growth
Question SS1p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS1p: Presumption in Favour of Sustainable Development is the right approach?

Login to respond

Spatial Strategy for North Lincolnshire

To meet North Lincolnshire’s future needs and achieve the spatial vision, the Local Plan must make provision for significant new growth in the most sustainable way. This means making sure that the new housing is matched by opportunities for new employment, accessible local services and a high quality environment. The spatial strategy seeks to deliver a more balanced approach to the location of new development in North Lincolnshire that seeks to meet our Objectively Assessed Needs, and maintain and enhance the vitality and viability of the areas’ communities.

Policy SS2p: Spatial Strategy for North Lincolnshire

The spatial vision and development needs for North Lincolnshire will be delivered through the spatial strategy outlined below, and on the key diagram. The spatial strategy will deliver growth in a sustainable and balanced manner that meet the area’s objectively assessed needs for new homes, jobs and infrastructure, whilst ensuring the natural and built environment is protected and enhanced.

The spatial strategy for North Lincolnshire will:

  1. Deliver at least 7,961 new homes (419 per year) to meet the needs of the existing and future population in sustainable and balanced communities.
  2. Support the creation 11,500 new jobs in our priority sectors and encouraging innovation.
  3. Develop at least 91.5ha of employment land in key locations that supports the delivery of housing growth, and provides opportunities for our priority sectors to grow, and meets the requirements of the commercial property market. Amongst these areas are South Humber Gateway; Scunthorpe; and strategic locations on Transport Corridors.
  4. Deliver and support the regeneration, enhancement and diversification of the area’s town, district and local centres as key hubs for retail, leisure and services for our communities.
  5. Ensure the delivery of sufficient physical, social and environmental infrastructure to support the area’s ambitions for housing and economic growth and meet identified needs.
  6. Support thriving rural communities and a vibrant countryside through the protection and enhancement of local services, creating opportunities for rural economic diversification and the promotion of tourism.
  7. Support the protection and enhancement of the area’s world-class natural and built environment to ensure its continued attractiveness and enabling safe environments and communities.
  8. Support and develop North Lincolnshire’s visitor economy and make it a destination of choice.

Decisions on investment in services and facilities, and on the location and scale of new development will be guided by the settlement hierarchy set out below:

  1. Major Sub-Regional Centre - Scunthorpe & Bottesford Urban Area
    • To maintain and strengthen its role as a key sub-regional centre, the Scunthorpe and Bottesford urban area will be the priority focus for growth in North Lincolnshire.
    • It will be the focus for the large-scale residential development through the provision of allocations in this plan including sustainable urban extensions. Non-allocated sites within the defined development limit will also contribute accordingly. Appropriate use will be made of previously developed land and greenfield sites. Major opportunities for employment will be provided in key locations within the urban area, whilst it will be the main centre for higher order services and facilities, retail, cultural activities, leisure, and commercial development. Opportunities for regeneration will be supported where they contribute to the spatial vision and objectives.
  2. Principal Towns - Barton upon Humber & Brigg
    • To maintain and enhance their roles as key service centres for North Lincolnshire, Barton upon Humber and Brigg will be a focus for growth including new housing, employment, retail and service provision. Most of this growth will be through site allocations in this plan. It may be possible for growth to take place on non-allocated sites within their defined development limits, where it is of an appropriate scale and nature, and meets the policies of this plan. All development should reflect the historic nature of each town, alongside existing environmental constraints such as flood risk.
  3. Large Service Centres - Barnetby-le-Wold; Barrow upon Humber; Belton (including Westgate & Woodhouse); Broughton; Crowle; Epworth; Goxhill; Haxey; Kirton in Lindsey; Messingham & Winterton
    • To maintain and enhance their role as large service centres, that provide local employment opportunities, and key services and facilities for their surrounding areas, these settlements will be the focus for an appropriate level of growth. This will be through the provision of allocated sites within this plan, and through non-allocated sites within their defined development limits. Any development should reflect the character and nature of each settlement, together with infrastructure capacity.
  4. Larger Rural Settlements - Burton upon Stather; Ealand; East Halton; Gunness; Hibaldstow; Keadby; New Holland; Owston Ferry; Scawby; South Ferriby; South Killingholme; Ulceby; West Butterwick; Westwoodside; Winteringham; Wrawby; & Wroot
    • Larger rural settlements will accommodate an appropriate level of development that supports their function. Sites of an appropriate scale and nature will be allocated in the plan. Non-allocated sites within the defined settlement development limit will also be supported. All development should take into account the nature and character of these settlements
  5. Smaller Rural Settlements – Alkborough; Althorpe; Appleby; Bonby; Burringham; East Butterwick; Eastoft; Elsham; Flixborough; Garthorpe & Fockerby; Howsham; Kirmington; Luddington; North Killingholme; Redbourne; West Halton; Wootton & Worlaby
    • These settlements will accommodate small-scale development of a limited nature, within their defined settlement developments, that supports their vitality and viability. Small sites will have a role to play. All development should reflect the character and nature of these villages and give due consideration to the availability and capacity of infrastructure to support its growth. All proposals will be considered on their merits.
  6. Rural Hamlets & Villages – Amcotts; Barrow Haven; Beltoft; Cadney; Carrhouse*; Cleatham*; Castlethorpe; Coleby; Croxton*; Derrythorpe; Dragonby; East Lound; Eastoft Carr*; Goxhill South End; Graizelound; Greetwell; Gunthorpe; Haxey Carrs*; Holme*; Horkstow; Kelfield*; Low Burnham; Manton; Melton Ross; Messingham Ings*; New Barnetby; Normanby; Roxby cum Risby; Sandtoft; Santon; Saxby all Saints; Thealby; Thornton Curtis; Ulceby Skitter; Walcott; Whitton & Wressle
    • Development will be limited to infill in those rural hamlets and villages that have defined development limits, provided that it is line with all relevant policies of the plan.
    • Settlement development limits will be defined on the Policies Map for those settlements identified in 1 to 5 above. Development in areas not listed above, or in rural hamlets and villages without defined development limits*, will be restricted to that which is essential to the effective operation of agriculture, horticulture, forestry, outdoor recreation and leisure, tourism, transport or utility services; renewable energy generation; and minerals or waste development in accordance with the relevant policies in this plan.

Key Diagram

Key Diagram

Policy SS2 sets out the level of new development that is needed in North Lincolnshire up to 2036, together with how, and where, it will take place. The spatial strategy is driven by the overall vision, coupled with the council’s ambitions for growth.

The preferred approach has an area-wide focus, spreading development across the area’s towns and villages beyond Scunthorpe, the Principal Towns and Larger Service Centres. This approach is supported by the community and key stakeholders. The exact distribution of housing and employment land is set out in policies SS5p and SS8p.

The level of growth in each of the area’s towns and villages is dependent upon their sustainability and ability to accommodate it. Consideration will be given to the availability of infrastructure and services and takes into account access to transport, employment and any environmental constraints. This does not necessarily mean that growth will happen everywhere.

Larger development will take place in Scunthorpe and the Principal Towns, whilst there will be opportunities for growth in the Large Service Centres, Larger Rural Settlements and Smaller Rural Settlements through the provision of appropriately-sized allocations or though infill opportunities within their defined settlement development limit. This will support their prosperity as well as maintain their local services and facilities.

The settlement hierarchy set out reflects the role and function of the settlements in North Lincolnshire and is based on factual information.

The implementation of the strategy will be dependent on working in partnership with a wide range of national and local stakeholders.

Alternatives Considered – Spatial Strategy

Four alternative options were considered for the spatial strategy.

Options A (Scunthorpe and Market Towns) and B (Six Market Towns and Scunthorpe) would not allow growth in other settlements within North Lincolnshire, therefore not supporting their vitality and viability and meeting the needs of these communities. Option C (Six Market Towns, Scunthorpe & Larger Service Centres), whilst having more dispersed growth, would have a similar effect.

Option D (A New Settlement) attracted limited support and would result in negative environmental impacts. Its deliverability was a concern due to the long lead in times required to identify an appropriate location, for land assembly and infrastructure provision, before development could take place. This would mean that development would still have to take place in other locations during the early years of the Local Plan.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Employment Rate aged 16-64 (%) National employment rate
Total residential net completions 419
Question SS2p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS2p: Spatial Strategy for North Lincolnshire is the right approach?

Login to respond

Development Principles

All new development in North Lincolnshire should contribute towards the creation of sustainable communities and a sense of place.

Policy SS3p: Development Principles

It is essential for new development, irrespective of its location, to make a positive contribution to North Lincolnshire and support the delivery of sustainable communities and places, where residents are safe, well, prosperous and connected. All proposals for development in North Lincolnshire should reflect the following key principles:

  1. Be of a high standard of design that is a sympathetic and appropriate to the area’s character, significance and setting in respect of its scale, massing, layout, function and materials. Development should create and reinforce locally distinctive and sustainable communities.
  2. Create safe, secure and inclusive environments for local people and visitors alike by including design and security measures that reduce actual and perceived opportunities for crime and anti-social behaviour.
  3. Promote and encourage the effective use of previously developed (brownfield) land (providing it’s not of high environmental value), whilst demonstrating the efficient use of land and resources by ensuring development is built at appropriate densities.
  4. Minimise the use of non-renewable and unsustainable resources, including energy, water and materials, during both construction and use. Waste reduction will be encouraged and appropriate reuse and recycling of materials including appropriate storage space and segregation facilities for recyclable and non-recyclable waste and prioritising the use of local materials.
  5. Minimise the impacts arising from climate change and mitigate against its effect, including, reducing flood risk.
  6. Provide high standards of amenity and privacy, by ensuring the impacts of development on adjacent and nearby properties are minimised. These impacts include noise, odour, fumes, dust or other nuisance, or the effects of overlooking or overshadowing.
  7. Aim to achieve the higher standards of sustainable construction and design through the incorporation of the principles of low carbon development. This could include the inclusion of renewable and low carbon technologies, and measures to reduce the consumption of resources.
  8. Plan positively and enhance local landscape characteristics, geological conservation interests and soils, and avoid, remedy or mitigate any impact on natural features and open spaces and maintain or where possible seek net gains in biodiversity.
  9. Consider built heritage and heritage assets from the earliest stages in the design process, in particular in terms of scale, density, layout and access.
  10. Ensure that development makes provision for good quality, accessible open spaces and green infrastructure, with existing spaces being retained and enhanced.
  11. Take account of existing and/or planned infrastructure, and contribute towards the provision of additional infrastructure to ensure that development is well served by physical, social and environmental infrastructure.
  12. Reduce the need to travel and minimise car use, and wherever possible, improve opportunities for walking, cycling and public transport.
  13. Contribute towards healthy communities and places, and consider the health impacts of development and the needs of existing and future users.

Policy SS3p provides a framework against which all proposals for new development in North Lincolnshire will be considered. It is noted that not all criteria will be relevant to every proposal, however applicants should still consider them, as they been asked to justify why an element is not relevant. This policy should be read alongside the complementary advice and guidance set out in national policy – National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) (July 2018) and Planning Practice Guidance (PPG).

The design of development is an essential part of creating sustainable communities and successful places. It also has a key role in projecting the image of the area, which is vital in attracting people, businesses and visitors, together with creating a sense of place.

All new development in North Lincolnshire should be of a high quality design and make positive contribution to its locality and the area as a whole. It should respect and respond to its surroundings, not harm local amenity, and protect local distinctiveness and character. Design and layout should be based on a clear understanding of the characteristics of the site and its context. This includes existing built form, heights, scale, massing, topography etc. Density is closely aligned with design/layout. These should make efficient use of land and resources using appropriate density levels. This could include the use of imaginative designs.

Retention and providing green spaces, planting and trees can play a role in visually enhancing a development and promoting health and well-being as well as creating a relationship with the wider landscape. It can also offer the chance to improve biodiversity.

In designing new buildings and spaces, climate change and the wider global environment needs to be taken into account. The use of sustainable design and construction techniques will be encouraged to reduce energy consumption, promote energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions and discourage the wasteful use of finite natural resources. Examples could include incorporating opportunities for energy minimisation and solar optimisation, or the use of renewable and low carbon energy.

Developments will also be designed to mitigate against and withstand the effects of climate change, including flooding. Sustainable design also includes the sustainable use of resources which play an important part in conserving materials and natural resources, which over time are likely to become scarcer.

A high quality built environment should consider the amenity of both existing and future residents and consideration should be given to matters of privacy, outlook, natural lighting, ventilation, as well as local climatic conditions.

Creating safe places and preventing crime are also important in realising sustainable communities. Including measures as part of the design process to reduce opportunities for crime and enhance security will be supported. Where appropriate, developers should consult Humberside Police for advice.

New developments should address how it meets sustainability criteria. This includes access to services, access to employment opportunities and impact upon the natural environment. Existing and proposed infrastructure, including access to public transport, should also be a key consideration in order to reduce the need to travel and minimise car use.

National policy highlights the important role for the planning system in improving the health and well-being of communities. This can be through the provision of accessible green spaces or opportunities for walking and cycling instead of using the private car, or ensuring access to jobs and services. All development must be accessible to all sections of the community, therefore their needs should be considered when designing new buildings and spaces, now and in the future. Like many areas North Lincolnshire’s population is getting older.

Alternatives Considered – Development Principles

This policy is a clear expression of those matters that need to be taken into consideration when preparing and assessing planning applications, and how they relate to North Lincolnshire. No reasonable alternative options were previously considered.

Question SS3p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS3p: Development Principles is the right approach?

Login to respond

Neighbourhood Planning

The Localism Act 2011 gave communities more control and influence over their area and how it should develop, with the main tool for doing this being the community-led Neighbourhood Plan. Neighbourhood planning allows residents, employees and businesses to come together through a local town or parish council or neighbourhood forum and say where, for example, they think new houses, businesses and shops should be located and what they should look like, and what infrastructure should be provided. Neighbourhood planning provides a powerful set of tools for local people to ensure that they get the right types of development for their community where the ambition of the neighbourhood is aligned with the strategic needs and priorities of the wider local area.

In general terms, any area can have a neighbourhood plan. They can cross local authority boundaries but they cannot overlap with adjoining neighbourhoods who also wish to prepare a plan for their area. The boundaries of the area will need to be agreed with and approved by the council.

In rural areas, it is expected that neighbourhood plans will relate to town or parish council areas. In some cases, plans could cover more than one town/parish area if there is agreement. For urban areas or areas without town or parish councils, neighbourhood areas will vary. For example, a neighbourhood area could cover a town centre or Business Park, a cluster of streets, or possibly an electoral ward.

Neighbourhood Plan policies cannot block development that is already part of the Local Plan. They can, however, shape where development will go and what it will look like. As well as Neighbourhood Development Plans, the Localism Act also enabled communities to shape development in their area through the production of Neighbourhood Development Orders and Community Right to Build Orders. Neighbourhood Development Orders and Community Right to Build Orders allow communities to grant planning permission either in full or in outline for the types of development they want to see in their areas.

In North Lincolnshire there are currently twelve communities with designated Neighbourhood Areas: Appleby; Barrow-upon-Humber; Brigg; Bonby; Elsham; Goxhill; Kirton in Lindsey; Saxby all Saints; South Ferriby; Winteringham; Winterton; and Worlaby. The neighbourhood planning section of the council’s website outlines current progress being made at the community level in North Lincolnshire.

Policy SS4p: Neighbourhood Planning in North Lincolnshire

North Lincolnshire Council will:

  • actively encourage local communities to develop a Neighbourhood Plan, where appropriate;
  • be proactive in providing appropriate information to communities about neighbourhood planning;
  • constructively engage with local communities throughout the process including when considering the recommendations of the independent examiner of a Neighbourhood Development Plan or Order proposal;
  • fulfil its duties and take decisions as soon as possible within statutory time periods where these apply;
  • set out a clear and transparent decision-making timetable and share this with those wishing to prepare a Neighbourhood Plan or an Order; and
  • following a positive referendum result in the neighbourhood area, ‘make’ the Neighbourhood Plan part of the North Lincolnshire Development Plan.

When developing a Neighbourhood Plan local communities will:

  • ensure the membership of the neighbourhood forum reflects the character and diversity of the local population
  • decide on the timeframe for plan production;
  • establish a dialogue with a range of organisations, partners and stakeholders;
  • establish a robust programme of community engagement and a proportionate evidence base; and
  • ensure it meets the specified ‘basic conditions’.

Neighbourhood planning enables communities to play a much stronger role in shaping the areas in which they live and in supporting new development proposals. This is because unlike the parish, village or town plans that communities may have prepared, a neighbourhood plan forms part of the development plan and sits alongside the Local Plan prepared by the local planning authority. Decisions on planning applications will be made using both the Local Plan and the neighbourhood plan, and any other material consideration.

Alternatives Considered – Neighbourhood Planning in North Lincolnshire

No alternative options considered. This policy sets out North Lincolnshire’s commitment to assisting communities to bring forward Neighbourhood Plans and the benefits it provides.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of Neighbourhood Plans made by North Lincolnshire Council All Neighbourhood Plans to be made by North Lincolnshire Council
Question SS4p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS4p: Neighbourhood Planning in North Lincolnshire is the right approach?

Login to respond

Overall Housing Provision

The North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 provides an evidence-based study that assists the council to assess what the local housing need is for North Lincolnshire for the period from 2017 to 2036. NPPF requires a council’s Local Plan to meet the local housing need for market and affordable housing in their housing market area and using the Standard Method in National Planning Guidance unless exceptional circumstances justify an alternative approach.

The North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 has determined that North Lincolnshire can be described as a self-contained housing market area in that the majority of households seeking to move; look for another house within the authority area. We should therefore plan for the needs of our existing and future communities without needing to look outside of North Lincolnshire. Discussions with our neighbouring authorities indicate there is no current requirement to take account of their housing needs.

The North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment 2019 used the standard method set out in the National Planning Guidance to determine the local housing needs for the area. The standard method identifies an overall local housing need of 7961 net additional dwellings over the plan period, the equivalent of 419 dwellings per annum.

To maintain the supply of housing the Government will publish annually in November the Housing Delivery Test results for each local authority. This Test will measure the number of net homes delivered against the number of homes required as set out in the strategic policies of each local authority’s local plan over a three year period.

The Government published the first Housing Delivery Test 2018 results in February 2019. The table below identifies that North Lincolnshire is required to include a 20% buffer within the five year land supply. A 20% buffer is required where there has been significant under delivery of housing over the past three years and the Housing Delivery Test indicates delivery was below 85% of the housing requirement. Table 1 identifies that North Lincolnshire delivered 73% of its housing requirement within this period.

Table 1: North Lincolnshire Housing Delivery Test 2018 Results

Number of homes required Total number of homes required Number of homes delivered Total number of homes delivered Housing Delivery Test: 2018 measurement Housing Delivery Test: 2018 consequence
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
514 505 399 1,418 379 272 386 1,037 73% Buffer

To provide additional flexibility and to assist in ensuring the council maintain a five year land supply of deliverable sites, the council will allocate an additional 20% of the total housing requirement within the first five years of the plan period. This equates to 419 additional homes and will provide choice and competition in the market for land.

Housing Trajectory

The North Lincolnshire housing trajectory illustrates the expected rate of delivery of new dwellings. It demonstrates how the objectively assessed need for an additional 7,961 new homes up to 2036 could be achieved. To meet objectively assessed needs, taking account of the additional housing delivered since 2017, an average of 419 additional dwellings a year are required between 2019 and 2036. The housing trajectory is set out in Appendix 1.

The SHELAA will be regularly updated and the Authority's Monitoring Report (AMR) will annually update the housing trajectory helping to ensure a five year supply is maintained throughout the plan period and signalling any need for intervention and/or Plan review.

Policy SS5p: Overall Housing Provision

Between 2017 and 2036, North Lincolnshire’s housing requirement is for 7,961 new dwellings to be provided (419 new dwellings per year):

Of these new dwellings around 2,153 will be provided from sites that already have planning permission or are under construction.

It is anticipated that the sites will be delivered in accordance with the housing delivery trajectory in Appendix 1.

A rolling five year supply of deliverable housing sites will be maintained. To provide flexibility in the delivery of housing the council will allocate an additional 419 dwellings within the first five years of the plan period. This equates to 8,380 dwellings over the plan period.

The purpose of this policy is to set out the overall level of housing provision that will be required to meet North Lincolnshire’s needs between 2017-2036. The policy will be mainly delivered through the allocation of sites in Policy H3. This Policy will be annually monitored using Government Housing Delivery Test to ensure the council maintain a five year housing land supply of deliverable sites. If it becomes apparent that a five year deliverable supply cannot be evidenced, or delivery is consistently below the housing requirement, the council will work with landowners and the development industry and take appropriate action in seeking to address any shortfall.

Alternatives Considered – Housing Growth

The Issues and Options identified the following four scenarios for housing growth based on the North Lincolnshire Local Housing Needs Assessment:

  • Scenario 1: Baseline Population Growth - 365 homes per year
  • Scenario 2: Medium Economic Projection - 452 homes per year
  • Scenario 3: Longer Term Economic Growth - 583 homes per year
  • Scenario 4: Aspirational Economic Growth (Core Strategy) - 754 homes per year

Since the Issues and Options Consultation the Government have published revised guidance on housing needs which includes the standard method approach. The council have used this approach for the preferred option.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Total residential net completions 419
Maintain a 5 year supply of land for housing Annual Update
Question SS5p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS5p: Overall Housing Provision is the right approach?

Login to respond

Housing Distributions

New housing will be distributed in relation to the following spatial strategy. This reflects Policy SS2 Spatial Strategy for North Lincolnshire locations of existing employment clusters, development constraints, accessibility and service provision. It specifically sets out that residential development will be commensurate with the scale of individual settlements and their position in the settlement hierarchy.

Policy SS6p: Spatial Distribution of Housing Sites

The delivery of new dwellings will be distributed as follows:

Settlement Housing Growth Total Dwellings
Major Sub-Regional Centre
Scunthorpe & Bottesford Urban Area (including Lincolnshire Lakes) 52.00% 4358
Principal Towns
Barton upon Humber 13.00% 1089
Brigg 12.00% 1006
Large service centres
Barnetby le Wold 1.00% 84
Barrow upon Humber 1.85% 155
Broughton 1.00% 84
Crowle 2.40% 201
Epworth 1.10% 92
Goxhill 1.00% 84
Haxey 1.00% 84
Kirton in Lindsey 4.50% 377
Messingham 1.19% 100
Winterton 2.60% 218
Larger rural settlements
Burton upon Stather 0.75% 63
Ealand 0.45% 38
East Halton 0.35% 29
Hibaldstow 0.95% 80
Keadby 0.18% 14
New Holland 0.14% 12
Scawby 0.45% 38
South Killingholme 0.25% 21
Ulceby 0.75% 63
Westwoodside 0.35% 29
Wrawby 0.60% 50
Wroot 0.15% 11
Total 100% 8380

Residential development in Smaller Rural Settlements, Rural Hamlets & Villages and in the open countryside outside the development limits, will be strictly limited. Consideration will be given to development, which relates to agriculture, forestry or to meet a special need associated with the countryside. All development should not have an adverse impact on the environment or landscape.

The purpose of this policy is to set out the spatial distribution of housing for North Lincolnshire in the most sustainable locations. The majority of new housing will be located within the Scunthorpe urban area, reflecting its sub-regional role. This will be followed in preference by the area’s Principal Towns, Large Service Centres and then the Larger Rural Settlements.

Larger development will take place in Scunthorpe and the Principal Towns, whilst there will be opportunities for growth in the Large Service Centres, Larger Rural Settlements and Smaller Rural Settlements through the provision of appropriately-sized allocations or through infill opportunities within their defined settlement development limit. This will support their prosperity as well as maintain their local services and facilities.

The level of growth in each of the area’s towns and villages is dependent upon their sustainability and ability to accommodate it. Consideration will be given to the availability of infrastructure and services and takes into account access to transport, employment and any environmental constraints. This does not necessarily mean that growth will happen everywhere.

Alternatives Considered

Four alternative options were considered for the spatial strategy.

Options A (Scunthorpe and Market Towns) and B (Six Market Towns and Scunthorpe) would not allow growth in other settlements within North Lincolnshire, therefore not supporting their vitality and viability and meeting the needs of these communities. Option C (Six Market Towns, Scunthorpe & Larger Service Centres), whilst having more dispersed growth, would have a similar effect.

Option D (A New Settlement) attracted limit support and would result in negative environmental impacts. Its deliverability was a concern due to the long lead in times required to identify an appropriate location, for land assembly and infrastructure provision, before development could take place. This would mean that development would still have to take place in other locations during the early years of the Local Plan.

These alternative options formed the basis of the Spatial Distribution of Housing Sites policy.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Total residential net completions 419
Maintain a 5 year supply of land for housing Annual Update
Question SS6p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS6p: Spatial Distribution of Housing Sites is the right approach?

Login to respond

Strategic Allocation - Lincolnshire Lakes Sustainable Villages

The Lincolnshire Lakes scheme was originally established in the LDF Core Strategy and Lincolnshire Lakes Area Action Plan (AAP) as a high quality residential, business and leisure location centred around a unique and breath-taking network of lakes, natural water bodies and green infrastructure. The council still recognises the importance of the Lincolnshire Lakes in re-positioning North Lincolnshire as a location for growth and investment.

The vision for Lincolnshire Lakes is to create an environment that will attract and retain skilled residents and investors in the sub-region and place North Lincolnshire on a new economic trajectory. The vision will create a major new sustainable waterside setting, with a strong network of linked blue and green spaces, high quality new social infrastructure and a new commercial and leisure park, forming an urban fringe of national importance, providing a gateway entrance to the town and a focus for sustainable development.

Lincolnshire Lakes builds on the rural heritage and Garden City traditions of North Lincolnshire through the creation of 3 new village settlements, each with a unique sense of place development through the use of landmarks, gateways, key buildings, framing and enhancing views integrated with lakes and water areas. New and existing residents should benefit from a range of social infrastructure, community facilities and increased flood resilience creating a much sought after village life.

By 2036, 3,000 new homes, a strategic mixed use area and local centres will be delivered creating sustainable communities in a highly accessible and inspirational waterside location. The remaining 3,000 will come forward post 2036.

Three new sustainable villages are proposed for allocation in the new Local Plan to deliver the required 3,000 dwellings. However, these villages are more than just housing areas. NPPF makes it clear that in order to promote healthy communities there should be an opportunity for all sections of the community to interact. This requires positive planning of shared spaces, community facilities (such as shops, meeting places, hotels, health and community centres etc.) and other services to help to deliver sustainable communities. The Strategic Mixed Use Area and Local Service Centres at the Lincolnshire Lakes will accommodate many of these functions and will effectively provide the range of day to day retail and employment uses alongside community uses which will be at a scale to help serve the people who live and work in this area.

To deliver Lincolnshire Lakes, significant infrastructure improvements will be required. The Lincolnshire Lakes Flood Defence scheme, comprising of 3.8km of continuous steel sheet piling, is expected for completion in summer 2019. The first lake, within the northern strategic site allocation, was granted in November 2017 and will provide surface water attenuation to adjacent villages. These developments form part of the overall flood mitigation solution for Lincolnshire Lakes ensuring future residents are safe. Lincolnshire Lakes will also provide greater connectivity between Scunthorpe, and the surrounding villages, with the strategic highway network through the provision of new junctions following the de-trunking and de-classification of the M181 motorway. The southern terminating junction was granted consent by the local planning authority in January 2019 and the northern junction in 2016. Alongside these strategic infrastructure interventions green and blue infrastructure will be required to interlink these communities and deliver sustainable development.

Policy SS7p: Strategic Site Allocation – Lincolnshire Lakes

The Lincolnshire Lakes will deliver 3,000 dwellings through the creation of 3 sustainable villages to assist in meeting the housing requirement within North Lincolnshire.

Development is required to be comprehensively masterplanned and to demonstrate how the phasing of development on these sites will have regard to the provision and timing of the infrastructure and services necessary to support them.

Each Village will deliver attractive, high quality design incorporating sustainable development principles, adopting sustainable construction methods, and using appropriate densities within the Lincolnshire Lakes area. Any application will be required to provide a comprehensive masterplan, including linkages to adjacent sites, and supply design codes in accordance with Policy DM1p and the Lincolnshire Lakes Strategic Design Guide. Design codes will be utilised to ensure distinctive, high quality design outcomes for the development.

All proposals will be required to submit a Flood Risk and Drainage Assessment in accordance with the Overarching Lincolnshire Lakes Flood Risk and Drainage Strategy. In order to meet the minimum acceptable flood risk standard, the minimum floor level of proposed new development should be lower than the 0.5% AEP plus Climate change flood level, plus 300mm freeboard allowance. Minimum floor levels for proposed new development should be checked against updated flood levels for the 0.1% AEP plus climate change event. The drainage of new development shall be designed to reduce surface water run-off rates to include the implementation of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS) unless it can be demonstrated that it is not technically feasible.

The Lincolnshire Lakes area will incorporate an interconnected network of good-quality, multi-functional green infrastructure including an adequate supply of different types of open space, in accordance with Policy GI1p (Green Infrastructure) and Policy CSC3p (Protection and Provision of Open Space, Sports and Recreation Facilities). Planning applications should also consider the specific impact of development proposals on biodiversity and associated opportunities for ecological protection and enhancement within each village and surrounding area.

The council will support the de-trunking of the M181 and the creation of the M181 Southern and Northern junctions to provide connectivity to Scunthorpe and the M180. A new Strategic Route east –west to Scotter Road (along the route of Burringham Road) and a new Primary Route linking the villages to each other and to the strategic network / Scotter Road is required.

The Lincolnshire Lakes will deliver an appropriate mix of house types and tenures to reflect the housing need in accordance with Policy H2p. Development will comprise of:

  • 1,800 dwellings in Northern Strategic Allocation (Villages 1 and 2)
  • 1,200 dwellings in Southern Strategic Allocation (Village 3)
  • 25.15ha of employment, up to 5,575m2 (gross) retail and leisure land in the Strategic Mixed Used Area

Northern Strategic Allocation (Villages 1 and 2)

The Northern Strategic Allocation should be designed in a way to create an attractive and seamless transition between the urban area and new villages. To achieve this, proposals are required to meet the following development requirements:

  • Village 1: Approximately 690 dwellings with a local service centre (300m2 gross)
  • Villages 2: Approximately 1,100 dwellings with a local service centre (500m2 gross)
  • Lake 1 will primarily be for non-motorised leisure and sport uses and provide surface attenuation for Villages 1 and 2 (approximately 35,150 cubic metres of attenuation must be provided as a minimum). The lake should be approximately 1km long with a minimum width of 100m and depth of 2.5m. The surface area should be approximately 13ha, surrounded by public accessible spaces that are designed for safe access and facilitates recreational walking, cycling and running along the lake side.
  • A new primary school or schools and associated playing pitches will be provided of a scale which will meet the expected requirement for school places generated by the new housing development. The primary school/s should be readily accessible to public transport, walking and cycling routes.
  • Each village will incorporate a local centre which will act as the focus for community activity including a minimum of one small convenience store for A1 (floor space approximately 200m2) and an allowance for A2, A3 and A5 units to facilitate a viable and vibrate community. The local centre will also including a building suitable to be used as a health centre.
  • Existing woodland (Brumby Grove and Brumby Common), mature trees and hedgerows should be retained within the new development sensitively arranged to create a parkland character.

Southern Strategic Allocation (Villages 3)

The Southern Strategic Allocation should be designed in a way to create an attractive and seamless transition between the urban area and new villages. To achieve this, proposals are required to meet the following development requirements:

  • Village 3: Approximately 1,200 dwellings with a local service centre (500m2 gross)
  • Lake 2 will primary be for non-motorised leisure and sport uses and provide surface attenuation for Village 3 (approximately 94,050 cubic metres of attenuation must be provided as a minimum). The lake should be approximately 1.5km long with a minimum width of 120m and depth of 2.5m. The surface area should be approximately 27ha, surrounded by public accessible spaces that are designed for safe access and facilitates recreational walking, cycling and running along the lakeside.
  • A new primary school or schools and associated playing pitches will be provided of a scale which will meet the expected requirement for school places generated by the new housing development. The primary school(s) should be readily accessible to public transport, walking and cycling routes.
  • The village will incorporate a local centre which will act as the focus for community activity including a minimum of one small convenience store for A1 (floor space approximately 200m2) and an allowance for A2, A3 and A5 units to facilitate a viable and vibrate community. The local centre will also include a building suitable to be used as a health centre.

Strategic Mixed Use Allocation

The Strategic Mixed Use Area will accommodate up to 25.15ha of employment, retail and leisure land. The following uses and threshold will be supported within this allocation:

  • Offices (B1a)
  • Hotel and Public House (C1 and A4)
  • Health Centre (D1)
  • Other D1 and D2 uses
  • Up to 5,575m2 (gross) of A1 retail floor space.

Access should be delivered from the De-trunked M181 Northern Junction.

The Lincolnshire Lakes AAP, adopted in May 2016, was supported by a significant evidence base that justified the approach to bring forward the site. Much of the evidence base is considered to be relevant to the policy above, however there has been change in the Council approach to deliver the critical infrastructure ahead of village development to ensure the site is safe in terms of flood risk and connected to the strategic highway network. This issue has affected the timescales proposed by the AAP for delivery of the Lincolnshire Lakes and has resulted in the policy requirement for 3,000 dwellings to be delivered over the plan period to 2036. However, the Council ambition to deliver Lincolnshire Lakes and create sustainable village communities within a waterside setting remains unchanged.

Alternatives Considered – Strategic Site Allocation – Lincolnshire Lakes

No specific option was considered for the Lincolnshire Lakes. In terms of Options for Growth a balanced approach was supported and that the Lincolnshire Lakes should still be a significant contributor.

Furthermore through the options consultation the Lincolnshire Lakes was regularly mentioned, and that it should continue to contribute to North Lincolnshire’s growth ambitions, strategic infrastructure and housing needs, and that the AAP and evidence should be integrated into the new Local Plan.

Question SS7p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS7p: Strategic Site Allocation – Lincolnshire Lakes is the right approach?

Login to respond

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of net additional dwellings completed at Lincolnshire Lakes Sustainable Villages 3000 new dwellings by 2036
Amount of land developed within the Strategic Mixed Use area for employment, retail and leisure uses. At least 10ha to be developed

Employment Land Requirement

Experian was appointed by the Council during late 2018 to prepare an economic forecast that evaluated the extent of anticipated job growth over the plan period up to 2036.

The Experian forecasting was run during January 2019 and considered a range of factors alongside economic activity trends and population growth. The latest application of the model forecasts approximately 11,500 jobs being generated over the plan period which equates to an increase of 13.8% for the period 2017 - 2036. It is specifically noted that the inputs into the model had been updated to the start of 2019, to reflect recent economic recovery, the latest population projections and the extent of known projects.

4,900 new jobs are forecast to be created up to 2036 under the traditional Use Class B1, B2 and B8 categories which relates to 43% of the total jobs growth for North Lincolnshire. Non non-industrial uses (i.e. non Use Class B1, B2 and B8 uses) have shown an increase in job growth with the service sector showing particular improvement. It is noted that a number of other sectors are showing signs of decline whilst for North Lincolnshire the recovering steel products sector classified under metal products is showing resilience. Over 57% of job creation is forecast to be generated from the Public Services sector such as Education and Health and other non B1, B2 and B8 uses.

The 2019 Experian forecasts took into account the economic thrust of the Local Enterprise Partnerships in addition to business enquiries to establish the potential for growth going forward.

Calculation of the Land Requirement

The Local Plan’s employment land requirement has been calculated by using the forecasted B1, B2, B8 job figure which have been translated to the floorspace required by using a density allowance and an assessment of site coverage of built form. See Table 2.

The B1, B2, B8 job forecast has then been applied to standard employment densities as used within the Employment Land Review which are consistent with the HCA’s Employment Density Guide. Floorspace requirements were converted to land take requirements based on the built site coverage. It is noted that the identified employment land figure should be considered as a minimum requirement subject to review as more evidence becomes available.

In order to ensure appropriate flexibility and choice, the Employment Land Review report recommended the use of an additional buffer of 50% of the total requirement to ensure appropriate flexibility and choice is available for operators. This results in a minimum land requirement, as identified in the Preferred Options Local Plan of 91.5 ha.

Table 2 Employment Land Requirement calculation

Total Land Requirement B1a/B1b B1c/B2 B8 Total
Jobs Total 2017-2036 1,000 2,900 1,000 4,900
NLC Job Density (job/sq. m) 19 50 80
Total Floorspace (sq. m) 19,000 145,000 80,000 244,000
Site Coverage 40% 40% 40%
Land Requirement (Ha) 4.75 36.25 20 61
50% Buffer (Ha) 2.375 18.125 10 30.5
Total land Requirement (ha) 2017-2036 7.125 54.375 30 91.5
Policy SS8p: Employment Land Requirement (including Strategic Employment Sites)

Over the period 2017 to 2036 provision will be made to deliver around 91.5 hectares of employment land.

The employment land requirement will be provided for in line with the overall Development Strategy identified in Policy SS2p and will be delivered by the sites allocated under Policy EC1p Employment Land Supply.

In addition to the Employment Sites listed under EC1p the following Strategic Employment sites have also been identified:

Strategic Allocations

Location Site Reference Policy Name Land-use Strategic Allocation site areas ha
South Humber Bank SS9p South Humber Bank B1,B2, B8 Estuary Related including energy generation 900
North Killingholme SS8-2p North Killingholme Airfield B1, B2, B8 138
Lincolnshire Lakes SS8-3p Lincolnshire Lakes Strategic Mixed use Area 25.15

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Amount of floorspace developed by type. Delivering at least 4.75 hectares of employment land within North Lincolnshire per annum and between 2017 and 2036.
Annual amount of employment land developed by type at the South Humber Bank. To deliver the South Humber Bank Strategic Allocation by 2036
Question SS8p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS8p: Employment Land Requirement (including Strategic Employment Sites) is the right approach?

Login to respond

Strategic Allocation - Employment

Land at the South Humber Bank is the area’s main strategic employment site. It is of regional and national significance being the last undeveloped employment land fronting a deep-water estuary in the UK. North Lincolnshire Council seeks to develop the South Humber Bank as a Global Gateway for the north of England by designating 900ha for employment uses. The South Humber Bank employment area is currently occupied by a range of estuary-related industrial operators such as large oil, gas and electricity companies, riverside terminal facilities and associated activities including storage, processing and distribution. The area is already home to a number of chemical companies which provide 27% of the UK’s oil refinery capacity. It is currently safeguarded and the current vision is to ensure that opportunities are maximised around the ports for chemical industries and power generation including renewable energy and off-shore wind manufacturing.

Recent proposals have seen the approval of the Able Logistic Park, a major port related development on land covering an area of around 939 acres (380ha). It includes plans for the creation of transport depots, warehousing and external storage areas, offices, a business park and motel. North Lincolnshire is also a major energy capital in terms of energy generation. This includes the emerging renewable energy and off-shore wind sectors. In essence, an “Energy Corridor” within the South Humber Bank has been formed which is expected to play a formative role in driving North Lincolnshire’s economic growth and prosperity. The “Energy Corridor” also extends into North East Lincolnshire and is pivotal in the economic success and prosperity for both authorities.

A key component of the “Energy Corridor” is Able UK’s Marine Energy Park (AMEP) that comprises the construction of a new quay approximately 1,320m long together with associated onshore facilities. This has the potential to accommodate wind turbine manufacture, assembly and commissioning covering a site of approximately 245ha of existing terrestrial land and 55ha of the existing estuary which has been approved by the Secretary of State. The two Able sites also form part of the Humber Enterprise Zone (EZ), the largest in the UK with the EZ supporting growth in ports, logistics and renewables and the region’s ambition to become a leading national and international centre for the renewables sector.

North Lincolnshire is fast becoming a major energy capital in terms of energy generation which includes the emerging renewable energy and off-shore wind sectors. Land at the South Humber Bank is therefore allocated as a Strategic Employment Site for B1, B2, B8 Estuary Related uses including energy generation to support these sectors. The development of North Killingholme Airfield is seen as an essential and integral part of the nearby South Humber Bank proposal and is, therefore, also identified as a Strategic Employment Site in order to assist in the deliverability of the South Humber Bank. North Killingholme Airfield is to be utilised, but not solely, for land intensive storage and distribution uses that would effectively sterilise prime industrial land set adjacent to the Humber Estuary. Other suitable uses for North Killingholme Airfield include energy generation (such as energy from waste) related depending on the scale and impact of the proposal.

South Humber Bank

The South Humber Bank (SHB) site is an expansive area of flat land located on the southern bank of the Humber Estuary. The site, although largely greenfield and isolated from a main built up urban area, is located within an existing industrial port landscape. The two existing large ports at Immingham and Grimsby (collectively one port) and the Humber Sea Terminal are the busiest ports in the UK by tonnage. The principle of developing the South Humber Bank for employment uses was identified in planning terms in 1955 and in the early 1960’s this led to the development of large scale industry, including oil refineries. Now there are two large oil refineries, three energy plants and various other port related developments. The undeveloped area has large areas of agricultural use and some previously developed land.

Proposed Development

The policy identifies a need for 900 hectares (gross area) of B1 (Offices/Light Industrial), B2 (General Industry) and B8 (Storage and Distribution) port related activities to take special advantage of its location within an existing port environment, flat topography and being adjacent to a deep water channel of the Humber Estuary. The land is allocated between and around the two existing ports of Grimsby and Immingham and the Humber Sea Terminal and includes preferred sites for waterbird mitigation

The site is uniquely located and offers special advantages with major port extension land adjacent to Grimsby and Immingham Port, which collectively with Grimsby Port forms the busiest port in the UK by tonnage handled. The deep water channel of the Humber Estuary offers the opportunity to create a new port along the frontage of the site between Immingham Port and the Humber Sea Terminal provided such a proposal can pass the tests of the Habitats Regulations.

The South Humber Bank employment site is North Lincolnshire Council’s premier employment site and is a large part of the South Humber Gateway, taking up a four mile area fronting the Humber Estuary. The SHB employment allocation is one of the last undeveloped deep-water estuaries in Europe and provides a unique opportunity for the economy of North Lincolnshire and the Humber to create high value and substantial employment opportunities on a transformational scale. It is therefore vital that this natural asset is developed so as to maximise the transformational economic potential of the site and must be safeguarded from piecemeal proposals and any investments that do not meet this maxim. It is therefore essential that the site is developed to maximise employment opportunities equivalent to the site’s strategic offer by creating major employment, high job densities and inward investment.

It will be important to respect the international, national and local nature conservation sites designated within and adjacent to the site. On a case by case base each individual development will be assessed to test whether its own EIA and Appropriate Assessment needs to be undertaken. A screening exercise will be carried out by the competent authority.

Land in the SHB is used by significant numbers of waterbirds related to the Humber Estuary SPA and Ramsar site. The loss of this land (as proposed by the allocation) means that it’s not possible to rule out an adverse effect on the integrity of these International sites. In order to mitigate against this adverse effect a Strategic Mitigation Plan for North Lincolnshire has been prepared. The Council has in recent years formed a collaborative framework of partners to help identify this mitigation and provide advice on how it might be delivered. The Mitigation Strategy for North Lincolnshire covers the SHB employment area. Equivalent documents have been produced by North East Lincolnshire Council. Taken together, the two independent Strategy documents form the Strategic Mitigation Strategy for the whole of the SHB.

The original SHB Mitigation Strategy was prepared during the same period as two major project proposals for port related development on Halton Marsh and Killingholme Marsh. Both projects have been through ‘appropriate assessment’. Natural England has agreed that waterbird mitigation for these proposals are acceptable as part of the Strategic Mitigation Plan. These mitigation areas within the SHB employment allocation (in relation to the Able UK Marine Energy Park (AMEP) at Killingholme Marshes and Able Logistics Park (ALP) at Halton Marshes) are in compliance with the Mitigation Strategy Plan for North Lincolnshire.

Able Uk have since brought forward an agreed alternative mitigation proposal on one site at Halton Marshes of at least equivalent area to that agreed under the ALP and AMEP projects. This approach has been agreed by the conservation groups and is the endorsed by this plan.

This approach will keep Policy SS7p flexible and give the policy longevity, without future cause to involve formal amendments to the Local Plan or possible Local Plan departure procedures. In effect the Mitigation Strategy for North Lincolnshire is a ‘living document’ that will provide continual updated robust evidence towards delivering and maintaining mitigation sites. There are options for waterbird mitigation/compensation to be provided beyond the boundaries of the SHB employment allocation as long as this does not affect the ability of the designated site to meet its conservation objectives. Other proposals which may come forward on the remainder of the SHB employment allocation (other than the proposed AMEP and ALP projects) will have to pass the tests of the Habitats Regulations.

The main transport documents that are relevant to the site are: North Lincolnshire’s Local Transport Plan 3 (2011 – 2026), the South Humber Bank Transport Strategy 2008 (updated 2010) and the Interim Planning Guidance for the South Humber Gateway (2011). The Transport Strategy proposes a package of transport infrastructure improvements that could be implemented to improve access to the South Humber Gateway and facilitate development. The Interim Planning Guidance is a document approved by the council to be used as a financial tool towards calculating contributions, as a basis for negotiation with potential developers of the site. A Transport Assessment will be required for each development in the area and it is recommended that developers contact the Transport Planning Team to discuss the scope prior to starting work. Applications should be supported by robust Travel Plans, where appropriate, which should demonstrate how the use of sustainable transport modes will be promoted and encouraged. The council is looking to produce an International Gateways: Area Wide Travel Plan, including the South Humber Gateway. All new and existing businesses/developers will be expected to sign up to it.

The South Humber Gateway is accessed via the local road network of Rosper Road, Eastfield Road and Top Road, via the A160/A180. The A160/A180 has seen significant highway improvements with the £96.6M Highways England’s A160 Port of Immingham Improvement Scheme completed in 2017.

Existing railway lines require some improvements to line speeds and signalling to offer a more sustainable method of transporting freight and additional capacity. Network Rail is committed to some of these improvements. At present there are rail sidings serving Conoco Phillips and Lindsey Oil refineries and serving the Humber Sea Terminal. Line speed and signalling improvements have recently been completed along the Immingham to Doncaster rail line to encourage faster average speeds and move train paths more efficiently. The council is working with Network Rail on securing Gauge Enhancements from the Ports out to the East Coast Main Line in Doncaster. By heightening bridges and widening platforms it achieves a standard of W10 and W12 which enables the transport of bigger containers and European containers out of the ports, increasing economic competitiveness as a leading UK port. These improvements are in Network Rail’s Northern Route Utilisation Strategy.

The expected port related activities on the site will in the main be heavy industrial users meaning pollution and waste control measures will be crucial to the success of the site in sustainability terms.

The South Humber Bank is a sensitive site in terms of the nearness of existing communities and major international, national and local nature conservation designations and the use of materials on site in construction and design should be managed in a way that recognises its sensitive position. The protection of residential amenity and construction timing so as not to disturb the nature conservation of the area (for example wintering birds) is crucial to the successful development of the site.

The South Humber Bank Landscaping Initiative (SHBLI) has been in place for many years. The SHBLI area’s boundary is as far west as the Skitter Beck (on the western edge of North Killingholme Airfield) and as far north as East Halton Skitter. The SHBLI deliberately covers a large area because distant wood and copse planting discretely located can have a better landscape effect than a large woodland area close to the edge of the industry. On site and off site landscaping schemes shall be considered within the framework of the South Humber Bank Landscaping Initiative in relation to development proposals.

The site is for port activities and is therefore necessarily located adjacent to a river. A large percentage of the area is within SFRA Flood Risk Zone 2/3a. Some 25% of the site, situated approximately west of the Humber Sea Terminal, is located in Flood Zone 1. Flood Risk Assessments (FRAs) will therefore be required for individual developments across the majority of the site and will be guided by the SFRA for North and North East Lincolnshire and the NPPF and its associated guidance on flood risk and development.

The Humber Flood Risk Management Strategy March 2008 (currently in a process of being updated) identifies the flood defences between the Humber Sea Terminal and East Halton Skitter as offering very little protection to the land behind. Negotiations are progressing with the Environment Agency, Natural England and the SHBGDG towards an amicable resolution. It is likely that some developer contribution to flood defences will be necessary. The land within the site behind these defences is some 130 hectares and a collaborative solution will be reached to benefit all parties involved.

There are a number of important designated heritage assets in the vicinity of this allocation including a line of Scheduled Monuments in East Halton and North Killingholme parishes. An assessment of the impact of proposals upon these assets will be required and the scheme will need to demonstrate how those elements which contribute to their significance will be conserved.

Policy SS9p: Strategic Site Allocation - South Humber Bank

The South Humber Bank employment site (900 ha- gross area) is allocated as a strategic site for port activities to take special advantage of its location, flat topography and being adjacent to a deep water channel of the River Humber as an extension to Immingham Port and Humber Sea Terminal the site has a unique employment offer. This employment site is a major part of the South Humber Gateway which forms a four mile area fronting the Humber estuary. It is one of the last undeveloped deep-water estuaries in Europe and provides a unique opportunity for the economy of North Lincolnshire and the Humber to create high value and substantial employment opportunities on a transformational scale. It is therefore vital that this asset is developed so as to maximise the transformational economic potential of the site and must be safeguarded from piecemeal proposals and any investments that do not meet this maxim.

The site will be developed with the following site specific criteria:

  • The site should provide only B1, B2 and B8 industrial land uses and ancillary development that are associated with port activities and energy generation proposals, including land based development allowing for the potential future development of a port that meet the tests of the Habitats Regulations.
  • The land within the site along the deep-water frontage of the Humber Estuary between the Port of Immingham and the Humber Sea Terminal has special locational characteristics and is unique, being one of the last undeveloped deep-water estuaries in Europe. New development is therefore required to maximise the potential for high value jobs and high job densities and this part of the site will be safeguarded against piecemeal development proposals that do not meet these employment maxims.
  • Development of the site shall only take place if there has been appropriate consideration given to the international, national and local protected sites for nature conservation. This includes complying with the tests of the European Habitats Regulations (Birds and Habitat Directives).
  • All development proposals within the site will have to comply with the Waterbird Mitigation identified in the SHB Mitigation Strategy. The preferred site for an on-site waterbird mitigation area at Halton Marsh is indicated on the Proposal Map. Off-site mitigation may be required depending on what on-site options are chosen.
  • A Transport Assessment and Travel Plan will be required for all large developments
  • An ecological assessment will be required
  • Pollution and waste control measures should be implemented wherever practical and relevant to the proposed development
  • Use of materials and development works shall be sensitive to the location
  • A structural landscape scheme is required as a buffer to limit the visual impact of development and improve the amenity of nearby communities between the western edge of the employment site and the villages of South Killingholme, North Killingholme and East Halton.
  • On site and off site landscaping schemes and biodiversity enhancement shall be considered within the framework of the South Humber Bank Landscaping Initiative in relation to development proposals.
  • Landscape buffering of at least 15 metres width around the Local Wildlife Sites will be required
  • A surface water and sewage management solution is required to accommodate development on the employment site to the satisfaction of the North East Lindsey Water Management Board and the Anglian Water Authority.
  • A Flood Risk Assessment will be required for individual developments on the majority of the site in compliance with National and Local flood risk guidance and Policy DQE6p.
  • Land to the north of the Humber Sea Terminal will require a flood defence enhancement scheme to be resolved with the Environment Agency, Natural England and landowners in relation to the existing flood defences and proposed development behind these flood defences.
  • A Heritage Assessment will be required to demonstrate that the development will have no adverse impact on the historic environment. Particular regard will need to be undertaken of the impact of any proposals upon those elements which contribute to the significance of the Scheduled Monuments to the west of this allocation. Development proposals should ensure that those elements which contribute to their significance are conserved.
Alternatives Considered

To achieve the economic prosperity as required in this Plan it is essential that sufficient employment land is identified that can bring about the required growth. By allocating less land that has been identified would not be a reasonable alternative as this would not be consistent with national policy, nor would it achieve the vision and objectives of the Plan. Furthermore it would not offer the range of sites, particularly within the context of the NPPF’s requirement to plan positively for growth and to ensure the borough’s indigenous growth potential is not constrained by a lack of spatial capacity in future.

There was support with the concept of continuing to over-allocate employment land in North Lincolnshire. Doing so would help to deliver the plan’s economic growth aspirations, highlighted in the draft spatial vision, as well as allowing some flexibility for new employment developments and opportunities to come forward. Furthermore, it would help to maximise prospects of attracting new investment to the area alongside meeting the demands of new and developing industries. Having a choice of sites was viewed as being necessary

Strategic Sites

As part of the Issues and Option coponsultation there was support for the delivery of the Able Marine Energy Park (AMEP) and Able Logistics Park (ALP) proposals as part of the wider South Humber Gateway area. It was highlighted that a number of schemes to improve the transport network in the area had been put forward, with some of these having been delivered, whilst the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership had recognised the importance of the gateway area to job creation and the wider economy. However, it was also questionned whether the proposals for the South Humber Gateway were viable or deliverable, alongside the current approach to the development of the site. It was stated that the development permitted under the Development Consent Order (DCO) had not come forward as envisaged and that instead a number of piecemeal proposals had come forward in recent times that did not reflect the intentions of the existing policy framework for the site. Particular concerns were expressed about the impact of these uses on existing drainage infrastructure and the environment.

Alternatives Considered

Through the consultation support was given for the continuing development of the South Humber Bank as a Strategic Employment site although concerns were expressed that the AMEP site may not come forward as a manufacturing hub for wind turbines. It was highlighted that there was commitment from its promoter as well as from other bodies/organisations to ensure that this occurs.

Support was expressed for retaining the current allocation in its current form. This includes the NPPF, PPG, and national objectives for the economy and environment. The existing Housing and Employment Land DPD’s policy has been well supported and partly implemented over the preceding years.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Annual amount of employment land developed by type at the South Humber Bank. To deliver the South Humber Bank Strategic Allocation by 2026
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Question SS9p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS9p: Strategic Site Allocation - South Humber Bank is the right approach?

Login to respond

Development Limits

Development limits for each settlement were set out in the existing North Lincolnshire Local Plan and the LDF Housing & Employment Land Allocations DPD and are strongly supported as a key tool in ensuring that future development occurs in sustainable locations. They also ensure that the countryside is protected from inappropriate development and no uncontrolled expansion of settlements will take place.

The exact extent of development limits will be defined in the Policies Map and insets. Development limits will not be applied to those settlements classed as rural settlements in the countryside. Development in these locations will only be permitted where it is appropriate to the functioning of the countryside.

Policy SS10p: Development Limits

Development limits will be applied to the Scunthorpe & Bottesford urban area, Principal Towns, Large Service Centres, Larger Rural Settlements and Smaller Rural Settlements. They will not be applied to rural settlements in the countryside.

In applying development limits the following considerations will be taken into account:

  1. Existing development patterns - the development limit will be drawn around the main built up area of the settlement. Scattered, sporadic or dispersed development or buildings separated from the main body of the settlement by areas of undeveloped land, roads or industrial areas will not be included. Where possible, limits should follow clearly defined features or constraints such as roads.
  2. Capacity - the ability of the settlement to accommodate future development based on existing and proposed infrastructure, on its access to facilities and services and levels of public transport. This also includes the availability of previously developed land.
  3. Existing planning consents/development - land with planning consent for residential development or community facilities where development has been implemented.
  4. Character - the limit will be drawn to reflect the need to protect and enhance settlement character. This means protecting areas of open space or land with the characteristics of open countryside within and adjacent to settlements by not including them within development limits. Large rear gardens or paddocks stretching well out the villages built form will also be excluded.

Development outside these defined boundaries will be restricted to that which is essential to the functioning of the countryside. This will include uses such as that related to agriculture, forestry or other uses which require a countryside location or that which will contribute to the sustainable development of the tourist industry.

The extent of the development limits will be defined on the Policies Map and settlement insets.

Alternatives Considered – Development Limits

The retention of settlement development limits within the Local Plan received overall support as a tool for managing growth and development in North Lincolnshire. Development limits were viewed as providing a degree of certainty for developers, communities and decision makers to determine where development should take place and on how other policies should be interpreted and applied.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of planning applications granted outside settlement development limits 80% of planning permissions to take place within development limits
Question SS10p

Do you think the Preferred Policy SS10p: Development Limits is the right approach?

Login to respond