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14 Connecting North Lincolnshire

Promoting Sustainable Transport

Transport has an important role to play in facilitating sustainable development through the promotion of walking, cycling and public transport as key modes of travel as an integral part of all developments. This also contributes to wider aspects of sustainability including improving people’s health and environmental quality, through reduced vehicle emissions and increasing active travel. Whilst behaviours, working patterns and lifestyle choices, coupled with emerging technological changes and innovation in how we travel, are changing transport choices, it is clear that new development will continue to generate additional transport movements, both now and in the future.

The availability and use of transport can have a significant impact, both positive and negative on people’s physical and mental health and wellbeing.

Transport, particularly vehicle emissions, are a major source of carbon dioxide emissions which, in turn, is a major cause of climate change. Other pollutants from vehicles include Particulate Matter and Nitrogen Dioxides, which impact on local air quality. Both of these can cause health problems. Short journeys are generally more polluting as vehicles tend to emit more pollution during the first few miles, while the engine is warming up. Traffic noise and vibration can also affect people’s physical and mental health and wellbeing. If traffic movements continue to increase then these adverse impacts will also be exacerbated.

Therefore transport can play a key part in the development of a low carbon economy through mode shift to walking/cycling for shorter journeys or an increase in electric/low emission vehicles. Many of the priorities identified in Policy T1p, will play an important part in helping to de-carbonise transport. Measures to reduce the need to travel, widen travel choice and reduce dependence on the private car, alongside investment in low-carbon vehicle technologies are an important part of helping to meet national climate change targets.

In addition to this, the role of transport in allowing people to easily access key services, employment, education and training will impact on their health and wellbeing. The ability to do so will positively improve the health and wellbeing of people, whilst an inability to do this, can result in people feeling isolated and excluded, which will have a detrimental impact on their mental health.

Walking and cycling should be the travel mode of choice for all short trips and an increase in these ‘active travel’ modes will improve people’s physical and mental health and wellbeing.

It is also important that pedestrian and cycle access is prioritised to and within new developments. North Lincolnshire is a wide ranging geographical area which is predominately rural in nature interspersed with Market Towns and the main Scunthorpe urban area. Scunthorpe is well served by public transport and is a compact urban area where journeys can be made by foot and cycle. This is also true for the Market Towns although they lack the range of services and facilities that the larger urban area can offer. The mode of travel for the majority of everyday journeys are very much reliant on where you live and where you want to travel to. Whilst walking, cycling and public transport should be promoted as the preferred mode of transport the rural nature of the area mean that the private car will still have an important role to play in everyday journeys.

It is important that all development is accessible both for all modes of transport and by all users irrespective of any mobility impairment. In order to achieve greater sustainability and assist in the efficient movement of people, developments must be served adequately by public transport, cycling, walking and the existing highway network.

With the exception of localised pinchpoints, congestion is not currently an issue in North Lincolnshire. However increased traffic growth from new developments, has the potential to impinge on the achievement of the economic, social and environmental objectives within this Plan. It is important therefore that major development proposals provide measures to reduce the impact of vehicular movements, including realistic, safe and easy alternatives to the private car. However to achieve this, developments need to be conveniently located within easy reach of key services by sustainable travel modes to make these a realistic and practical option to the private car.

The Local Transport Plan (LTP) is being updated to align with the new Local Plan. It will set out the key transport and infrastructure challenges to delivering the council’s outcomes of Safe, Well, Prosperous and Connected and how these can be overcome within North Lincolnshire. The proposed Transport Vision is:

“A well connected transport network that supports sustainable communities within a safe and prosperous environment, which support the wellbeing of people who live and reside in North Lincolnshire”.

In order to realise this vision, the Transport Strategy will adopt the following outcomes:

  • Ensure the network is safe for all users
  • Improve people’s wellbeing through the promotion of walking and cycling as key modes of travel
  • Achieve a prosperous North Lincolnshire by implementing transport improvements in key development areas and along key strategic corridors
  • Develop a connected transport network which provides good access to key local hubs and services by all modes of transport, which is accessible to all.

It is proposed that transport schemes delivered through the LTP block allocations will be packaged into the following themes:

  • Pedestrian Improvements
  • Cycling Improvements
  • Public Transport Improvements
  • Local Safety Schemes
  • Demand Management
  • Highway Asset Enhancement and Renewal.

It is therefore recognised that significant benefits can be achieved by locating developments in places where the need to travel will be minimised and the option to make sustainable choices can be maximised.

Policy T1p: Promoting Sustainable Transport

Promoting Sustainable Transport

To reduce congestion, improve environmental quality and encourage more active and healthy lifestyles, the Council will support measures that promote more sustainable transport choices.

Where appropriate, proposals should seek to:

  • focus development which generates significant movements in locations where the need to travel will be minimised;
  • prioritise pedestrian and cycle access to and within the site and provide connections into the wider network;
  • make suitable provision for access to public transport and other alternative means of transport to the car;
  • make suitable provision to accommodate the efficient delivery of goods and supplies; and,
  • make suitable provision for electric vehicle charging, car clubs and car sharing when considering parking provision.
Alternatives Considered

A number of options were proposed at the Issues and Options Stage being: - Option A: Require new developments to demonstrate within a Transport Statement how they facilitate walking and cycling and the use of public transport. Option B: Require that new developments make available information on walking, cycling and public transport links to all new residents. Option C: Seek contributions to infrastructure to support sustainable transport choices through S106 agreements. It was clear that no on option predominated and that a combination of the three with other considerations was the preferred approach.

To have no policy - this was rejected due to consultation feedback that demonstrates that sustainable transport is a major issue for local residents and businesses.

Support was expressed for the continued introduction of sustainable transport measures. This forms a fundamental part of the NPPF, PPG, and national objectives for the economy and environment. The existing LDF’s policy has been well supported and partly implemented over the preceding years.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy None upheld at appeal.
Question T1p

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Public Transport in North Lincolnshire

Rail

Unlike many other rural areas North Lincolnshire is generally well served by rail infrastructure (see Key Diagram), with the Trans-Pennine line providing direct links to the East Coast Main Line at Doncaster and across to Manchester for the airport and West Coast Main Line. There are local services provided on the Barton Branch line, a semi regional service from Grimsby to Lincoln via Barnetby and a Saturday only service running along the Brigg line from Cleethorpes to Gainsborough and Sheffield.

What is lacking is the provision of appropriate services running along the infrastructure and providing the connections that support the wider spatial strategy and enabling the sustainable movement of people to access work, training, education, health and leisure facilities.

Bus

In North Lincolnshire, buses are currently the most viable alternative to the car, particularly for commuter, shopping and leisure trips and are used by far more passengers than the rail services.

The majority of North Lincolnshire’s bus services are operated from Scunthorpe Bus Station and are provided by two main bus operators, Stagecoach and Hornsby Travel with the existing bus network split into urban and rural or inter-urban services. The main bus corridors in Scunthorpe are along Doncaster Road and Oswald Road/Ashby Road with the majority of urban services operating as a circular route to and from Scunthorpe Bus Station, which provides easy and direct access to the Town Centre. The majority of services also pick up and drop off passengers on either Mary Street or High Street and this provides good access to the western part of the main retail centre. The rural/inter-urban services operate throughout the rest of North Lincolnshire, linking the more rural settlements with key urban centres both within and outside of North Lincolnshire. Much of the network is subsidised with only a handful of services operating on a fully commercial basis. This is not untypical of an area with such a large rural hinterland with some very low density areas of population.

In an attempt to address weaknesses in bus provision the Council, as part of the Department for Transport (DfT) sponsored Total Transport Initiative, developed a pilot project to test the viability and feasibility of DRT bus services in the more rural parts of the authority’s area. The pilot project ran until March 2017, at which time the authority decided to maintain the services. It procured operators to deliver the CallConnect services with a call centre managed by Lincolnshire County Council as part of a Service Level Agreement and the buses run by local operator Hornsbys.

Public Transport Vision

The shift to a more polycentric spatial strategy that starts to direct more development away from Scunthorpe towards the other Principal Towns and other large service centres requires a recasting of public transport provision with a need to maintain focus on supporting Scunthorpe but also to start to better connect the surrounding key settlements not just with Scunthorpe but also with each other.

Rail transport is suitably well placed to play a significant role in supporting the spatial strategy not least because the vast majority of identified settlements are on the rail network and infrastructure improvements are in the main not required. However, what is needed is a significant alteration to service provision and a transformational change to the timetables and connection opportunities. The rail network in North Lincolnshire is greatly underutilised for the movement of people and is an asset that can, with modest alterations to service provision provide significant opportunities to support the spatial strategy and encourage and support modal shift and the sustainable movement of people.

Coupled to this alteration to rail services is the need to improve bus service provision to plug the gaps in the rail network. Notably to provide an improved direct link between Barton and Brigg via Barnetby linking identified housing and employment sites. Short term subsidy is likely to be required for such a service but longer term with the support of other policies in this Plan and the LTP a commercial and sustainable operation should be achievable.

Furthermore a radical alteration to bus service provision with a significant shift towards Demand Responsive Transport (DRT) based upon the lessons learnt from the pilot project and substantial advances in booking and scheduling technology is required. This would see the replacement of many of the heavily subsidised fixed route services with a flexible DRT system enabling passengers to book and travel when they want to rather than being tied to a timetable. This web of DRT would link into the fixed nodes such as rail stations and other key interchange points enabling complete mobility and connectivity across the authority’s area without the need to access a car.

Policy T2p: Promoting Public Transport

Promoting Public Transport

To support the spatial strategy and encourage sustainable transport use the Council will support measures and actively encourage through partnership working a transformed level of public transport service provision.

This will include actively pursuing changes to rail franchises and timetables to improve services on the rail network to better integrate and link the key settlements.

Provide for improved infrastructure at key interchange points.

Support DRT services across the area by seeking contributions from developers.

Alternatives Considered

Support was expressed at the Issue and Options stage for public transport measures and initiatives. In terms of the transport network, it was considered that the area’s roads should provide good links between communities and employment, whilst there should be more frequent and cheaper public transport provision to allow local people to access employment opportunities. It was also highlighted that development should not be permitted if it is not supported by appropriate transport infrastructure. If this not the case, they should only be allowed in sustainable locations where transport is already in place and in line with the development strategy.

To have no policy - this was rejected due to consultation feedback that demonstrates that sustainable public transport is a major issue for local residents and businesses.

Support was expressed for the continued promotion of public transport measures. This forms a fundamental part of the NPPF, PPG, and national objectives for the economy and environment. The existing LDF’s policy has been well supported and partly implemented over the preceding years.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Question T2p

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New Developments and Transport

NPPF seeks to balance the transport system in favour of sustainable transport modes, giving people a real choice about how they travel. It requires development to give priority to pedestrian and cycle movements and have access to public transport. This Local Plan recognises that development management provides an opportunity to seek to modify travel demands and habits to promote sustainable development.

NPPF states that all developments that generate significant amounts of movements should be supported by a Transport Assessment or Statement, which will in turn inform a Travel Plan. The required level of assessment should be discussed and agreed with the Council, prior to submitting a planning application.

Transport Assessments set out the transport issues relating to proposed major developments and identify what measures will be taken to deal with the anticipated transport impacts of a scheme. This assessment is integral to the production of a Travel Plan. A Travel Plan aims to improve accessibility and safety for all modes of travel, particularly for alternatives to the car such as walking, cycling and public transport, for a particular development or organisation. It will therefore identify initiatives and measures that are specific to the development or organisations own circumstances and requirements. All Travel Plans would be expected to include the following:

  1. Site assessment and audit
  2. Impact assessment of the proposed uses
  3. Objectives and overall strategy
  4. Appropriate measures to encourage/deliver outcomes/targets
  5. Targets
  6. Arrangements for carrying out review and monitoring of the Travel Plan
  7. Steps to be taken to promote/disseminate identified measures to the end users
  8. Timetable for implementation of measures

The Travel Plan measures for each site will vary depending upon the circumstances of each development, the requirements and travel patterns of the site users and the constraints and opportunities offered by the site itself. However, measures which should be considered include:

  • Site layout designed to encourage and maximise opportunities to walk and cycle and allow for access by bus services and provision of bus stops
  • Provision of direct, convenient and attractive pedestrian and cycling routes to local facilities and which connect into the wider network
  • Information provided on the health benefits of walking and cycling (e.g. maps and online references)
  • Provision of secure, sheltered and adequate cycle parking facilities
  • Provision of changing/shower facilities, drying rooms and cycle locker facilities at work places
  • Introduction of financial incentives to encourage cycling (e.g. cycle mileage allowance for work use)
  • Provision of site specific public transport information (e.g. maps, leaflets)
  • Provision of discounted ticketing and season ticket loans.

For a Travel Plan to work successfully, a Travel Plan Coordinator should be appointed, who will be responsible for:

  • Implementing the Travel Plan measures
  • Liaising with users of the development and promoting sustainable travel
  • Liaising with stakeholders, including the Local Planning and Highway Authorities
  • Monitoring the effectiveness of the Travel Plan
  • Reviewing the Travel Plan and preparing Action Plans.
Policy T3p: New Development and Transport

In order to increase overall accessibility, minimise congestion and improve safety, new development will be supported where it is accessible, or can be made accessible, by sustainable modes of transport and addresses its likely transport impact. Development proposals should:

  1. Produce and agree a transport assessment and travel plan, where requested by the Council
  2. Support, encourage and promote sustainable travel options, which may include walking, cycling, public transport, electric and ultra-low emission vehicles, car sharing and car clubs particularly in the Scunthorpe and Bottesford urban area, principal towns and large service centres
  3. Bring forward other necessary transport infrastructure to accommodate expected movement to and from the development
  4. Be provided with a satisfactory access which must ensure the safe operation of the highway. Proposals that cannot be served by a safe access and/or would adversely affect the safe operation of the highway will be refused.
  5. Not have an adverse impact on the network's functioning and safety. Proposals that have significant transport implications will be expected to deliver necessary and cost effective mitigation measures. Such measures shall be secured through conditions and/or legal agreements.

Developers will be required to demonstrate that their development is adequately served by a variety of modes of transport and will not have an adverse effect on transport near the site. The Council will require developers to contribute towards measures in the vicinity of the development to enhance the following, both on and off site:

  • Public transport services and infrastructure, providing bus stops within a 400m walk of all new developments
  • Facilities for pedestrians and cyclists
  • On street parking controls
  • Traffic calming/reduction measures

These measures will be secured through planning conditions and/or legal agreements.

Alternatives Considered

A number of options were proposed at the Issues and Options Stage being: - Option A: Require new developments to demonstrate within a Transport Statement how they facilitate walking and cycling and the use of public transport. Option B: Require that new developments make available information on walking, cycling and public transport links to all new residents. Option C: Seek contributions to infrastructure to support sustainable transport choices through S106 agreements. It was clear that no one option predominated and that a combination of the three with other considerations was the preferred approach.

To have no policy - this was rejected due to consultation feedback that demonstrates that sustainable transport is a major issue for local residents and businesses.

Support was expressed for the continued introduction of sustainable transport measures. This forms a fundamental part of the NPPF, PPG, and national objectives for the economy and environment. The existing LDF’s policy has been well supported and partly implemented over the preceding years.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Question T3p

Do you think the Preferred Policy T3p: New Development and Transport is the right approach?

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Parking

Parking provision should generally meet the anticipated level of demand for the development following the implementation of any travel planning measures. Therefore in locations where good sustainable transport linkages exist, alongside easy access to shops and services, less provision may need to be made. Getting this balance right is crucial as failure to provide sufficient parking can lead to indiscriminate parking that not only looks unattractive but can be unsafe or lead to neighbour disputes. The NPPF has introduced greater flexibility to take account of the particular nature and setting of development and the importance of local factors in determining the level of car parking provision is recognised. These relate to the need to revitalise an area, the extent to which an area is environmentally sensitive, to the availability of infrastructure for cyclist and pedestrians, and the availability of public parking facilities.

The Council will work with partners to ensure that car parking is managed to support the economy and sustainable communities. The lack of, or poor planning of parking provision, can have a negative impact on the public realm and the local highway network and can restrict the accessibility and mobility needs of people and businesses. Over provision and poor management can lead to inefficient land use and can also discourage greater use of more sustainable modes of transport.

Traffic congestion is directly linked to air pollution with the most polluting vehicles being those with older diesel engines. This contributes to increases in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions in the atmosphere. Air pollution is damaging to human health and can exacerbate respiratory problems including asthma and inflammation of the airways as well as many other ill health effects. Poor air quality is the largest environmental risk to public health in the UK and therefore measures to address it should be considered as a priority.

The Climate Change Act 2008, committed the UK to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 80% by 2050. In order to meet this target, the Government has committed for nearly every car and van in the UK to be zero emissions by 2050 as set out in their Road to Zero Strategy 2018. The strategy sets out how this will be achieved:

  • The UK will end the sale of all new conventional petrol and diesel cars/vans in 2040.
  • The UK will ‘develop one of the best Electric Vehicle Charging Point (EVCP) networks in the World.

There are also many benefits to the owner of electric vehicles including lower fuel costs, no road tax and no congestion chargers in some inner city areas. As such, any measures that can be taken now to facilitate this change to low emission vehicles will help to future-proof development within North Lincolnshire.

The Government’s Clean Growth Strategy 2018, states that the Public Sector is to lead the way to transitioning to zero emission vehicles. To ensure the district is prepared for future changes in vehicle demands, it is essential that the necessary infrastructure to facilitate the uptake is provided. Therefore, new development should seek to deliver high standards of sustainability in accordance with Local and National Planning Policy. NPPF (revised 2019) encourages the provision of electric vehicle charging points (EVCP) in development by ensuring an adequate provision of spaces for charging plug-in and other ultra-low emission vehicles and that development should be designed to enable charging of plug-in and other ultra-low emission vehicles in safe, accessible and convenient locations. It is also stated in paragraph 179 of the Framework that ‘Planning policies and decisions should sustain and contribute towards compliance with relevant limit values or national objectives for pollutants, taking into account the presence of Air Quality Management Areas and Clean Air Zones, and the cumulative impacts from individual sites in local areas’.

There are a number of options available in the UK for the charging of electric vehicles. Consideration for the implementation of EVCP’s needs to be given to the location, vehicle type, required speed of charge, future proof and UK wiring regulations. It is expected that the following guidance documents are considered for the implementation of EVCP installations:

  • ‘Code of Practice for Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment Installation’ written by IET Standards (www.theiet.org/resources/standards/ev-cop.cfm) or with the equivalent most up to date guidance note.
  • ‘A Guide to Electric Vehicle Infrastructure’ by BEAMA (2015), or the equivalent most up to date copy (www.beama.org.uk)

Developers are now required to demonstrate that they are making all reasonable efforts to minimise total emissions from development sites during both construction and operational phases. This will include the requirement to promote and incentivise the use of low emission vehicles to reduce the overall emission impact of development related traffic.

Policy T4p: Parking
  1. Development proposals that generate additional parking demand should ensure that appropriate vehicle, powered two wheeler and cycle parking provision is made. The form and scale of off-street parking required will be assessed against the following:
    1. the accessibility of the development;
    2. the type, mix and use of the development;
    3. the availability and frequency of public transport services; and,
    4. local car ownership levels.
  2. Developers will be expected to have considered and incorporated measures to minimise parking provision without causing detriment to the functioning of the highway network, local amenity and safety.
  3. Where private and/or public on-site parking for public use is to be provided at least 5% of parking bays, should be designed, set out and reserved for people with mobility impairments. Such parking bays should be located as close to the main access to the building as possible.
  4. Parking should incorporate facilities for electric vehicle charging and other ultra-low emission vehicles where appropriate, including parking courts and at non-residential locations. The type and number of chargers will vary dependant on location. One charging point per residential parking space should be provided.
  5. Development proposals that make provision for surface parking areas to serve more than a single household, visitor, employee, or customer, should ensure that appropriate low maintenance landscaping is integrated into the design and layout of the sites.
  6. Electric Charging Points are to be provided to the following standards:
Type of Development Requirement
Residential Dwellings with secure parking (defined as a house with a garage or a private driveway) 1 electric vehicle charging point per dwelling
Dwellings with private allocated off curtilage parking 1 electric vehicle charging point per 10 parking spaces. Passive provision (cabling laid out to enable future provision) is provided for the remainder of the spaces
Other types of development (Commercial/industrial/retail etc.) Up to 50 parking bays
At least one electric vehicle charging point which must be marked out for use by electric vehicles only
Greater than 50 parking bays
Electric vehicle charging points totalling 2% of the total car parking space provision. These must be marked out for use by electric vehicles only.
Type of charging equipment provided to be agreed with the Local Planning Authority and is dependent on end use requirement.
Where provision is required for taxi waiting, the taxi spaces will be expected to include electric vehicle charging facilities.
Mixed use A combination of the above requirements to be agreed with Local Authority.

Cycle and Motorcycle Parking

Parking provision for cycles and motorcycles should also be considered. Cycling offers a cost effective, environmentally friendly way of travelling and is good for people’s health. Correct provision of cycle parking facilities can encourage more people to cycle. However, incorrect provision can put people off cycling or result in bikes being parked inappropriately. Motorcycles are also a good way to travel around, they cause less congestion and can be less polluting than a car. If people are to be encouraged to use motorcycles the design of parking facilities need careful thought, fear of theft is one of the biggest deterrents to motorcyclists. Both cycle and motorcycle parking take up less space than car parking and are cheaper to provide.

Policy T5p: Cycle and Motorcycle Parking

Development proposals that generate additional parking demand should require that adequate cycle and motorcycle parking provision is made. This should be:

  1. Well signed, easy to find and benefit from good natural surveillance
  2. Cycle shelters and compounds should be provided for all day/long stay parking
Alternatives Considered

To have no policy - this was rejected due to consultation feedback that demonstrates that parking is a major issue for local residents and businesses.

It is considered that there needs to be flexibility to provide appropriate car and cycle parking based on local circumstances and the maximum standard is not always considered appropriate. A flexible approach ensures that the standard is applicable locally.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Monitoring car parking provision by type and size of scheme. To ensure that sufficient car parking is provided without a detrimental impact on highway safety.
All non-residential schemes to have EV charging points provided as per the standards established in policy T4p. 100% compliance with this policy.
Question T4p

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Question T5p

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Moving Freight

The efficient movement of freight is of significant importance in North Lincolnshire. The Ports of Immingham and Grimsby are the busiest ports in the UK in terms of tonnage handled. In addition to these, there are several smaller ports and inland wharves, which are an important part of the local economy and allow for the import and export of various cargos, including steel, timber and dry bulk.

The majority of freight is moved by road and the environmental impact of these movements can be reduced by the increased impact of rail and water transport. Although the proportion of total freight that is transported by rail is small, it is anticipated that 25% of all UK rail freight passes through North Lincolnshire.

It is predicted that by around 2020, over 50% of containers arriving at UK ports will be on ‘high cube’ containers. Work has been completed on the railway line between Doncaster and Immingham to provide W12 Gauge Clearance, to allow these containers to be transported and encourage a modal shift from road to rail. One intermodal train is the equivalent to 43 HGVs, therefore a mode shift from road to rail for container traffic would significantly reduce vehicle emissions and reduce air quality. It is estimated that per tonne, rail freight produces around 76% less C02 emissions than road haulage and also less than a tenth of the nitrogen oxide and fine particulates of road haulage per tonne carried.

Road freight is prevalent in North Lincolnshire and it is acknowledged that there is a shortage of lorry parking in the area, particularly around Scunthorpe and the South Humber Gateway. This leads to inappropriate parking in these areas with associated negative environmental impacts, such as littering.

Policy T6p: Freight

The existing network of rail freight routes and infrastructure will be safeguarded. Disused railway alignments will be protected from development where there is a reasonable prospect of their re-use for transport purposes.

The use of rail for goods traffic will be encouraged by ensuring:

  1. New developments which generate freight capable of bulk transport by rail are located close to rail facilities wherever possible
  2. Greater use of private sidings and the introduction of new ones
  3. Provision of rail freight handling facilities at ports and other appropriate facilities.

Support the development of a freight strategy to include lorry parking sites, HGV route management and provision of facilities for (and promote the benefits of) transferring freight delivery from road to rail and/or water transport, wherever practical, particularly in relation to the movement of freight to and from the South Humber Ports and Trent Wharves.

Alternatives Considered

A policy is required that maximises the sustainable freight potential of North Lincolnshire’s railways and waterways whilst acknowledging that the majority of freight movements is still by HGV.

To have no policy - this was rejected due to consultation feedback that demonstrates that sustainable transport including freight is a major issue for local residents and businesses.

Support was expressed for the continued introduction of sustainable transport measures. This forms a fundamental part of the NPPF, PPG, and national objectives for the economy and environment.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Question T6p

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Safeguarding Transport Infrastructure

The Council has identified a number of transport infrastructure schemes that will assist in delivering the economic and housing growth that this Plan promotes and seeks and are seen as being fundamental of delivering this plan’s housing and employment sites. Funding for the majority of the schemes is sought from the Local Enterprise Partnerships and other external funding sources and are in varying stages of consideration.

Lincolnshire Lakes

The highways infrastructure is required to unlock land for housing and facilitate development including:

  • Creation of two new junctions on the M181, southern (terminal) junction and northern junction, with associated de-trunking and reclassification of the M181 to an A road
  • Further works will be required to the de-trunked M181, including new signage, reduced speed limits and provision of footway/cycleway between Frodingham Grange and the Northern Junction to complement the de-trunking works.
  • Signalised junction at West Common Lane/Scotter Road
  • Junction improvements at Burringham Road/Scotter Road
  • Junction improvements at Scotter Road/Brumby Wood Lane
  • Provision of high quality pedestrian and cycling infrastructure throughout the site, including the down grading of Brumby Common Lane to become a non-motorised user route and upgraded facilities on Burringham Road
  • High quality public transport services and facilities

Brigg Link Road

The primary aim of the Brigg Link Road is to gain access to the five housing allocations in Brigg to the north and west of the town (approximately 820 dwellings across sites H1P-9p, H1P-10p, H1P-11p and H1P-12p). A Link Road from Wrawby Road, across Grammar School Road to Atherton Way through the land allocations is required as an integral part of the development.

Barton Link Road

To support the growth of the manufacturing sector in Barton upon Humber and unlock land for future housing, a new road is recommended to the immediate south of the town. This will link the A1077/Falkland Way to the A15 via the B1218, reducing traffic flows, particularly HGVs, through the town centre.

Melton Ross Bridge

This structure carries the A18 over the South Humber Mainline (rail), linking Humberside Airport to the M180 at Barnetby Top. The bridge is currently in a weakened state and the only long-term practical solution is the provision of a new structure. This will ensure that this section of the A18 remains open to all vehicles and maintains unimpeded linkages between the Airport and M180. This would assist in opening up development land at the airport.

Improved access to North Killingholme Airfield

North Killingholme Airfield is a strategic employment site, which is closely linked to the employment land allocation at the South Humber Bank. Currently the Airfield is accessed via Lancaster Approach. However a new access is required to improve access to the site, provide resilience and minimise the impact of development traffic on residents. Further work is required to identify a preferred option of a new access route and external funding would be required to deliver this.

Improved access to Sandtoft Industrial Estate

Local access improvements to serve Sandtoft Business Park are required. These include:

  • Junction improvements at A18/High Levels Bank/Jaques Bank
  • Localised improvement/widening at Brooks Corner
  • Carriageway widening to M180 overbridge
  • Roundabout at site access on C202 Idle Bank
  • Link road through the site and associated internal infrastructure
  • Roundabout on Belton Road
  • Traffic Management measures on Westgate Road.

These measures will be developer led and delivered in a phased manner in accordance with a masterplan accompanying any planning application(s) to be agreed with North Lincolnshire Council.

Policy T7p: Safeguarding Transport Infrastructure

The Council will safeguard the routes of, and support measures which deliver, maintain and improve, key transport infrastructure, identified on the Policies Map, namely:

  • Lincolnshire Lakes road and transport infrastructure
  • Brigg Link Road
  • Barton Link Road
  • Melton Ross Bridge
  • Improved access to North Killingholme Airfield, to provide an alternative access to Lancaster Approach
  • Improved access to Sandtoft Industrial Estate
Alternatives Considered

The schemes listed under Policy T7 are all required as part of road improvements and/or highway safety schemes. They are essential in terms of delivering the key economic objectives for this Plan. As part of the consultation on the Issues and Options Local Plan a number of alternative schemes were put forward but it is considered that the ones listed under this policy are those supported by this Council and are not simply a wish list of aspirational schemes.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Safeguard the routes and support measures as highlighted in Policy T7p ‘Safeguarding Transport Infrastructure’ 100% compliance with this policy.
Question T7p

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Safeguarding Aviation

North Lincolnshire has a rich aviation history and the council recognises the importance of aviation to the local and regional economy. Aviation creates jobs, encourages the economy to grow and connects the UK with the rest of the world as a dynamic trading nation. It is also important for maintaining social and family ties. This is why the growth of aviation is supported and the benefits this would deliver, provided that growth takes place in a sustainable way, with actions to mitigate the environmental impacts.

There are two international airports in and around North Lincolnshire that provide air links to Europe and beyond - Humberside Airport and Doncaster Sheffield Airport. Humberside serves over 230,000 passenger a year and enjoys three daily direct flights to/from Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport – one of the globe’s major hub airports, which offers connections to over 800 destinations worldwide.

Humberside Airport is located adjacent to the A18 at Kirmington some two miles to the east of Barnetby Top Interchange with the M180/A180.

The airport has established air traffic associated with the off-shore gas production and exploration and UK domestic and European flights. In addition there a number of charter flights with the number being seasonally influenced. The airport has also been the subject of significant investment in recent years. It is currently one of largest helicopter base in the UK for the off-shore oil and gas industry in the southern North Sea, a role and a market segment which is continuing to grow.

In addition to Humberside Airport there are a number of privately owned airfields across North Lincolnshire that are used for a variety of flying related activities that fall under the general aviation sector. All of which are located on former RAF airfields utilising runways and facilities originally established during WW2.

These facilities provide a valued contribution to North Lincolnshire’s economy and offer commercial and private flying in a variety of forms. It is considered that local airfields offering general aviation flying should be protected from development that would have an adverse impact on the running and operation of the airfield, unless it can be demonstrated that the airfield use is no longer viable.

The Trent Valley Gliding Club, since the early 1970s, have flown from the grass airstrip located to the south of the technical buildings at the former RAF Kirton in Lindsey which was opened in 1940 as a fighter base.

Hibaldstow airfield, originally developed for Bomber Command in 1941 but used by fighter command has been home to Skydive for over 25 years and has become one of the UK’s largest dropzones.

Sandtoft airfield, a former WW2 satellite bomber base is home to a private airstrip and is commercially run and offers flying and plane repairs/maintenance.

Policy T8p: Safeguarding Aviation

The Humberside International Airport site, Sandtoft Airfield, Hibaldstow Airfield and the landing area at the former RAF Kirton in Lindsey is safeguarded for aviation uses. Any development at Humberside Airport itself, or on nearby sites, which will prejudice the aviation use of the site will not be permitted. Any development at Sandtoft Airfield, Hibaldstow Airfield and the landing area at the former RAF Kirton in Lindsey, or on nearby sites, which will prejudice the current aviation use of the site will not be permitted unless it can be proven that such use is no longer viable and that the site is not required for aviation purposes.

Alternatives Considered

Support was expressed at the Issue and Options stage for suitable and continuing development at Humberside Airport which would assist in North Lincolnshire’s economic growth. It is, therefore, essential that the airport and other airfields which involve commercial flying are protected from inappropriate development proposals that could prejudice current and future flying operations.

It was also highlighted that development should not be permitted if it is not supported by appropriate transport infrastructure. If this not the case, they should only be allowed in sustainable locations where transport is already in place and in line with the development strategy.

To have no policy - this was rejected due to consultation feedback that demonstrates that sustainable transport, including airport operation and development is a significant issue for local residents and businesses.

Monitoring

Indicator Target
Appeals upheld contrary to this policy. None upheld at appeal.
Safeguard the airports/airfields and landing strips as highlighted in Policy T8p ‘Safeguarding Aviation’ 100% compliance with this policy.
Question T8p

Do you think the Preferred Policy T8p: Safeguarding Aviation is the right approach?

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