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11 Creating Sustainable Communities and Better Places

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Introduction

The vital role that planning plays in creating and supporting strong, vibrant communities where people can live healthy lives is well recognised and is a key element in delivering sustainable development. Planning can also play a key role in reducing health inequalities. A healthy community is as a good place to grow up and grow old in. It is a place, which supports healthy behaviours, social connectedness and mental wellbeing.

The link between planning and health has been set out in the NPPF and PPG. It recommends that local plans should aim to achieve health objectives through the quality of new places. This includes securing healthy, inclusive and safe places and access to open space and sport and recreation facilities, which can make an important contribution to the health of communities and can help in tackling obesity. Active Travel is seen as key to this plan; ensuring that pedestrians, cyclists and other road users travel safely to and from home. The Government also attaches great importance to ensure that a sufficient choice of school places is available to meet the needs of existing and new communities.

Health and wellbeing is a cross cutting theme, policies on inclusive design, greenspace, active travel, transport and housing in subsequent chapters will play a key role in reducing health inequalities and encouraging healthy lifestyle choices. Social isolation describes the state of being deprived of social relationships that provide positive feedback and are meaningful to the individual (PHE, 2015). Reducing social isolation and improving social contact and connections improves mental wellbeing. Our communities and individuals will flourish and thrive and be more resilient if they are integrated, enabled and connected to education, employment, social, cultural and wellbeing opportunities. Connected and flourishing communities also gives us an opportunity to grow a network of local mental wellbeing champions. Social isolation is not exclusive to older people. It is multi-faceted and complex, operating at an individual, community and societal level.

The built and the natural environments are major influences on health and wellbeing and delivering sustainable communities is at the heart of the planning system. This means ensuring that alongside homes, jobs and transport infrastructure, all local people have ready access to those services and facilities they need for their everyday lives and that contribute positively to the health and wellbeing of the community.

Integrating public health and spatial planning enables us to deliver local neighbourhoods that promote healthy lifestyles, which in turn can prevent ill health, and thereby relieve the pressure on healthcare services and reducing health inequalities.

This chapter includes policies to deliver the Plans vision to improve health and wellbeing and to promote healthy and safe communities.

Local Context

The North Lincolnshire Council Plan 2018/19 has several outcomes including safer communities, safer environments, safer spaces, cleaner and greener spaces, good health and wellbeing, vibrant leisure and culture, improved quality of life, improved skills, thriving education, flourishing communities and a strong sense of pride and belonging.

The Council has a variety of core leisure and recreation facilities that serve the whole community, including Normanby Hall, 20-21 and the Ropewalk visual arts centres, North Lincolnshire Museum and Waters’ Edge Country Park and Visitor Centre. North Lincolnshire also offers a number of managed indoor and outdoor sport and recreation facilities for active and competitive sports. The area’s exceptional natural setting and wealth of open spaces also provides a wonderful stage and a range of opportunities for outdoor recreation and leisure.

The Council has great input towards the prevention of mental ill health and the promotion of good mental wellbeing in terms of Social Care, parks and open spaces, housing, and education, all of which influence and support the wellbeing of our residents. We will utilise all our available levers, whether statutory or non-statutory, excellent leadership and our oversight roles and responsibilities to properly support our local communities to be resilient and mentally well.

Health and Wellbeing

Health and wellbeing is about more than having access to quality healthcare. What also matters is living in a safe, clean and green environment, having a decent home, an adequate income, a purpose in life and living in communities, which are supportive, healthy, connected and resilient.

Active healthy lifestyles are made easier through the pattern of development, good urban design, good access to local services and facilities; green open space and safe places for active play and food growing, which are accessible by walking, cycling and public transport. Buildings in the centre of their communities will also play a key part in supplying services to reflect community needs such as chair based exercise for less mobile community members or more active sessions for those who want to move more.

The five ways to Wellbeing are a set of evidence-based actions, which promote people’s wellbeing. They are: Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Keep Learning and Give. The creation of healthy living environments for people of all ages supports social interaction. It meets the needs of children and young people to grow and develop, as well as being adaptable to the needs of an increasingly elderly population and those with dementia and other sensory or mobility impairments.

North Lincolnshire’s Health and Wellbeing Board will focus on some of the key lifestyle issues identified as having a significant impact on the health of our population. The Board will develop an action plan to ensure that all partners are working together to tackle some of the complex lifestyle behaviours in our population.

North Lincolnshire’s health priorities and issues are set out in the latest Council Plan and Integrated Strategic Assessment for North Lincolnshire. The Integrated Strategic Assessment supports and informs the Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy and a range of commissioning, service planning and delivery activity by a number of organisations in North Lincolnshire. The Integrated Strategic Assessment is aligned to the Councils four strategic outcomes of ‘safe’, ‘well’ ‘prosperous’ and ‘connected’. Under the strategic outcome for ‘well’ is good health and wellbeing, although all four of the outcomes play a part in contributing to health and wellbeing. Our new Local Plan sets the framework for how planning can contribute to the Council Priorities of prosperous, well, safe and connected.

The Integrated Assessment and North Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Assessment of Health and Wellbeing (JSNA) Strategy 2018 focuses on what range of services can better work together for the health and wellbeing of North Lincolnshire. It is therefore important that our new Local Plan sets the framework for planning decisions that will contribute to an improvement in the health of local residents. Some of the key challenges regarding healthy communities in North Lincolnshire are:

  • improving on the current low levels of active travel;
  • excess weight and obesity, including unhealthy weight in childhood;
  • mental ill health;
  • a need for smoke free places to reduce harm from tobacco;
  • tackling physical inactivity and excess weight in the population;
  • pockets of poor air quality associated with heavy industry;
  • an ageing workforce;
  • reliance on medication when alternative strategies may be more effective (e.g. social prescribing);
  • above average rates of some potentially preventable conditions; and
  • high use of urgent care in some communities.

The North Lincolnshire All Age Mental Wellbeing Strategic Framework builds on the aims outlined in the national No Health Without Mental Health (DOH, 2011), The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health (NHS Mental Health Taskforce, 2016) and the key themes of Future in Mind (DOH, 2015) through the following key objectives:

  • Prevention, recognition and early intervention for mental ill health and wellbeing.
  • Reduction of stigma and discrimination.
  • Good mental wellbeing to be at the heart of all planning and priorities in North Lincolnshire.
  • To make mental wellbeing everyone’s business.
  • To promote and embed ‘The 5 Ways to Wellbeing’ across North Lincolnshire.
  • To reduce the number of suicides in North Lincolnshire.

Inequalities in mental health arise due to the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age. Within our communities, social determinants of good mental health include the economic status of the area, levels of neighbourliness and the quality of housing and open spaces.

In addressing these priorities and issues, it is essential that community needs are supported through appropriate physical and social infrastructure, and by other facilities and key services which contribute to improving physical and mental health and wellbeing, and the overall quality of life experienced by residents.

Access to green space and low congestion is a strength in North Lincolnshire. The Council want people to reside, work and socialise in healthy places, where healthy life styles are the norm. The Council recognises the impact on health of air pollution and the strong link between employment and positive health. It is also important to make sure that impacts such as noise, smells, pollution and fumes that can arise from some developments, such as industrial uses, are considered and managed. In turn this can help to create cleaner and greener places.

Good design and planning can make sure that the layout of new development encourages more people to make journeys on foot or bicycle. There are benefits to people’s health from having shopping and community services that are easily accessible by walking, cycling or public transport. This can be more challenging to achieve in rural communities where distances to facilities are greater and public transport infrastructure may be lacking.

Planning for new roads can help direct heavy goods vehicle traffic away from homes, helping to reduce the impacts on residents health. Positive health impacts can result from increased employment. They can also arise by ensuring housing is designed with access to green space, and with public transport and traffic management in mind (e.g. car free zones, self-enforcing speed limits, walking/cycling links between residential and business areas).

Living in a warm and energy efficient home can improve general health outcomes, reduce respiratory conditions, improve mental health and reduce mortality. Good quality housing can also reduce the risk of unintentional injury, such as falls.

As part of creating safer places, tackling the fear of crime in North Lincolnshire and reducing actual crime also needs to be considered. Through design, the planning system can help ensure that new development creates safer places, reduces the incidence of actual crime and the fear of crime.

Creating healthy living environments and well designed buildings are important. Promoting physical activity through the design and location of development to make walking and cycling more attractive and promoting the creation of tobacco free places, such as smoke-free town centres and smoke-free parks and playgrounds is also important. Walkable neighbourhoods can improve levels of both physical activity and social engagement. Providing and maintaining a 'green infrastructure' network including different clean and healthy types of green space, places to play, allotments and walking and cycling routes to encourage regular physical activity and improve wellbeing and quality of life is also required.

The impacts of proposed developments on health should be assessed and considered by the applicant at the earliest stage of the design process, to avoid negative health impacts and ensure positive health outcomes for the community as a whole.

The Planning Practice Guidance refers to health impact assessments. Health Impact Assessments (HIA) consider the potential impacts of planning policies and decisions on health and health inequalities. They identify actions that can enhance the positive effects and mitigate or eliminate the negative effects of developments. A health impact assessment (HIA) helps ensure that health and wellbeing are being properly considered in planning policies and proposals and should be considered at the very outset of developing planning proposals or strategies to ensure positive health outcomes.

The Local Plan will be able to help promote physical activity by securing a high quality public realm and through the provision of local parks and places to play, sports and leisure facilities and cycling and walking facilities, which are essential to the health and wellbeing of the population.

Policy CSC1p: Health and Wellbeing

The Council will seek to improve health and wellbeing in North Lincolnshire. In order to achieve this the Council will:

  1. Take the potential for achieving positive mental and physical health outcomes into account when considering all development proposals. Where any adverse health impacts are identified, the applicant will be expected to demonstrate how these will be addressed and mitigated.
  2. Promote improvements and enhancing accessibility to the historic environment, greenspaces and green infrastructure corridors.
  3. Recognise the vital role heritage plays in people’s lives by safeguarding and enhancing the quality of our surroundings to ensure positive impacts on individuals and communities.
  4. Use the ten principles of Active Design and develop neighbourhoods and centres that:
    • are connected, safe, accessible and attractive so that crime and disorder, and fear of crime do not undermine the quality of life or community cohesion;
    • paths, play areas and open spaces are overlooked by inhabited buildings while maintaining the privacy of inhabitants;
    • easily accessible on foot or by bicycle to all users;
    • improve infrastructure and layouts to support, encourage and connect walking and cycling routes;
    • have high quality streets and spaces ensuring that streets and paths are adequately lit;
    • have active buildings in which the design and use should promote opportunities for physical activities;
    • have a strong sense of place, which encourages social interaction and continual use of public areas;
    • have access to a range of facilities and amenities including transport, education, health, sport and leisure and community facilities;
    • are designed to promote higher levels of physical activity, through the arrangement of buildings and uses, access to open space and landscaping and the provision of facilities to support walking and cycling;
    • have facilities and open spaces which should be accessible to all users and should support sport and physical activity across all ages.
  5. Support the integration of community facilities and services i.e. health, education, cultural and leisure in multi-purpose community buildings;
  6. Development schemes safeguarding and, where appropriate, enhancing the role of allotments, gardens and food markets in designated public and private spaces accessible from the home, school or workplace providing access to healthy, fresh and locally produced food;
  7. Ensure development does not have an adverse impact on the environment or residential amenity through air, noise, vibration and water pollution;
  8. Make provision for the needs of an ageing population by promoting a range of development which supports independent living and avoiding the need for residential care;
  9. Work with relevant stakeholders to reduce geographical inequalities in health through maximising the provision of affordable housing and regenerating poorer neighbourhoods within the area;
  10. To require in the case of development of 50 or more homes or 1000sqm commercial floorspace, the submission of a Health Impact Assessment (HIA); as part of the planning application to explain how health impacts have been identified and how they will be addressed and mitigated and how they have informed the design.

Key issues to address through this policy are to ensure development proposals consider the impacts and potential for achieving positive mental and physical health outcomes. Helping communities, experience a high quality of life is important and it is essential that community needs are supported through appropriate physical and social infrastructure and by other facilities and key services. This will enable communities to flourish and keep people safe and well. Active healthy lifestyles that are made easy through the pattern of development, good urban design, good access to local services and facilities, green open space and safe places for active play and food growing and is accessible by walking and cycling and public transport.

The Council encourages developers to use the Sport England Active Design principles to inform design and layout of development proposals to promote healthy communities and the key principles are included in the Health and Wellbeing Policy. Planners should also use Active Design in determining planning applications. This will help to achieve improved physical activity across the local population through the creation of high quality active and inclusive environments.

The impacts of proposed developments on health should be assessed and considered by the applicant at the earliest stage of the design process, to avoid negative health impacts and ensure positive health outcomes for the community as a whole.

PPG states a health impact assessment may be a useful tool to use where there are expected to be significant impacts. Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) are a combination of procedures, methods and tools by which developments may be judged to assess potential effects on the health of a population and the distribution of those effects within the population. By providing HIAs for major developments, and/or other significant development which capture health issues. They will contribute towards health priorities of the ‘Health and Wellbeing Board’ and partners to help reduce health inequalities across the area. They will support the provision of new or improved health facilities and protect existing health and community facilities.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. There was overall support of including a Local Plan policy for Health and Wellbeing. There is no specific policy related to health and wellbeing in the NPPF. NPPF sets out the purpose of the planning system as being ‘to contribute to the achievement of sustainable development’. Creating places that are safe, inclusive and accessible and which promote health and well-being is recognised by the NPPF.

Question CSC1p

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of permissions granted contrary to this policy. No permissions granted contrary to this policy.
Number of Planning applications for 50 dwellings with a Health Impact Assessment. All applications for 50 dwellings or more to have a Health Impact Assessment.

Proposals for new health care facilities

Proposals for new health care facilities should connect effectively to public transport services, walking and cycling routes and be easily accessible to all sectors of the community. Proposals which utilise opportunities for the multi-use and co-location of health facilities with other services and facilities, and thus co-ordinate local care and provide convenience for the community, will be particularly supported.

The focus of future land and facility requirements will be on ensuring there is adequate primary care provision in the area to meet local needs. The Council will support the provision of additional health facilities and will work with NHS England and the Clinical Commissioning Group and other service providers to ensure the area has a necessary supply and distribution of accessible premises to meet health care needs. Further information on health infrastructure is set out in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

In addition to the provision of health services, the built and natural environment plays a key role in encouraging children, young people and adults to engage in more physical activity, play, recreation and sports. This could lead to improved physical and mental health, reduced segregation and isolation, and prevent long term illness, such as diabetes, depression and cardiovascular disease. Spatial Planning can also reduce and mitigate adverse impacts on health, by managing noise and air pollution, and designing walking routes and cycle lanes.

North Lincolnshire Council has established four main Community Wellbeing Hubs, in Scunthorpe, Barton, Brigg and Epworth. There are a further three satellite Hubs in Crowle, Broughton and Winterton. The Hubs community wellbeing offer includes:

  • Information, advice and support
  • Healthy and safe lifestyles advice
  • Wellbeing checks for those aged 75+
  • The facilitation of community meals and social activities

The hubs have forged links with GP surgeries, local pharmacies, local businesses, voluntary groups and organisations to ensure services reflect and are responsive to need.

North Lincolnshire Council’s Wellbeing at Work Healthy Workplace Award Scheme is designed to provide a framework of support to help businesses promote and enable positive health and wellbeing in the workplace and provide recognition to those organisations who value workplace health.

Health Care Provision

North Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is the NHS organisation responsible for designing, developing and buying local health services in the North Lincolnshire area. The primary role of the CCG is to assess the health needs of the North Lincolnshire population and make sure safe, sustainable and high quality healthcare services are in place. Their strategic plan sets out the five year plan and the vision for health services across North Lincolnshire. NHS England is responsible for the commissioning of primary care services including local GP’s and dentists. Responsibility for Public Health services (such as Health Trainers, stop smoking services and emergency planning) is with the Council. However, the Director of Public Health for North Lincolnshire works in a joint role across both the CCG and the Council, thus ensuring that the NHS continues to contribute directly to the prevention of health issues.

The Council’s commissioned public health services include open access sexual health services, substance misuse services and 0-19 public health services (health visitors, school nurses and associated healthy child programmes). The Council also provides healthy lifestyle services to increase the number of people who are tobacco free, increasing the number who eat a healthy diet, increasing the number of people who are physically active, increasing the number of people who drink alcohol within the recommended limit and increasing mental wellbeing.

The goal is to achieve flourishing communities with high levels of wellbeing with a focus on prevention and asset-based working. Health and care services will become more integrated so that when people do need support they will get the right support at the right time in the right place to best meet their needs.

In the UK, over the next 50 years, the population aged over 65 will double and that the population aged over 85 will quadruple. Older age is related to chronic diseases, which are typically more prevalent as longevity increases, for example cancer, diabetes, heart disease, respiratory conditions, stroke, dementia and depression. A distinction can be made between life expectancy and healthy life expectancy, the latter being how long a person can expect to live in good health. Age-friendly local physical environments are shown to be a key factor in ensuring active, healthy ageing and mobility, preventing long term conditions from developing, and enhancing healthy life expectancy. Prevention and creating the right environments can reduce pressure on public services. In addition to providing care and rehabilitation, we need to consider housing and the design of the built environment for a sustainable, healthier future.

The vision for the future in North Lincolnshire is one where people are enabled to manage their own health and live healthily. There will be a strong focus on ensuring people have the knowledge and support to self-care, supported by care delivered in community settings where clinically safe to do so. Services will be designed to respond to patient needs rather than service needs, with many services delivered in multiple community based settings, supported by appropriate transport services to meet the needs of people with restricted mobility. Where people do require hospital care, this will be delivered locally where appropriate, but it is recognised that for some types of care, it is necessary for this to be delivered in a centre of excellence to maintain high quality and deliver value for money. Focus will be on the delivery of proactive, integrated care, which enables people to maintain or return to independence.

It is important to ensure that the development of primary and social care buildings facilitate improvements in the range and quality of services offered in primary care.

Policy CSC2p: Health Care Provision

The Council will support the implementation of health care provision in North Lincolnshire, in order to modernise and improve the primary health care facilities, and to improve the health of residents through safeguarding and enhancing open space, facilities for sports and recreation and improving walking and cycling routes.

  1. Where appropriate, developers should consult with health care commissioners at an early stage in order to understand the need for new or enhanced health care infrastructure and improved access to primary and mental health care facilities;
  2. That the healthcare infrastructure implications of any relevant proposed development have been considered and addressed;
  3. Proposals for new health care facilities should provide high standards of accessibility to all sectors of the community and should connect well to public transport services, walking and cycling routes and be easily accessible to all sectors of the community. Proposals which utilise opportunities for the multi-use and co-location of health facilities with other services and facilities, and thus co-ordinate local care and provide convenience for the community, will be particularly supported.
  4. The loss of health care facilities or land allocated for such purposes will be resisted, unless there is no longer a need for the land or building in any form of health care use, or there is an acceptable alternative means of meeting such need to the same or higher standard in terms of community benefit.

Developers will be expected to make an appropriate contribution towards necessary improvements, additional provision improvements or additional provision for health care services and facilities arising from their development proposals, in accordance with the Developer Contributions SPD.

Where major new housing proposals would result in an increased demand for health care facilities which cannot be met by existing health care accommodation, a developer may be required to enter into a S106 planning obligation in order to secure the provision of, or contribution towards new or extended facilities.

On proposals of 11 dwellings or more in areas with the greatest health care impact including Scunthorpe, Barton Upon Humber, Brigg, Kirton in Lindsey, Broughton, Winterton, Crowle and Barrow upon Humber developers will be expected to make a payment towards health care provision.

The level of Section 106 contribution for health is proposed number of dwellings in development x dwelling rate £549.35.This calculation is based on an analysis of future requirements and standardised BCIS building rates for health centre accommodation and any future updates.

The implementation of new facilities supported by this policy will be permitted subject to other relevant plan policies.

Key issues to address through policy and public consultation are protection of existing facilities to meet current and future need and demand; investment in healthcare infrastructure, importance of location, access to services, housing quality, transport options and mobility and proximity to social infrastructure.

An assessment of primary healthcare accommodation requirements for North Lincolnshire based on the housing allocation numbers has been completed. This includes a formulae which shows how primary healthcare accommodation requirements can be converted into a Section 106 contribution calculation for healthcare. The calculation looks at the capital element of providing the additional health centre accommodation. It uses a proposed rate per dwelling based on the estimated build cost of the additional accommodation divided by the total number of proposed new housing units. This work was used to inform the Healthcare Provision Policy.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. There was overall support of including a Local Plan policy for Healthcare provision. NPPF states strategic policies should set out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development and make sufficient provision for community facilities such as health.

Question CSC2p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC2p: Health Care Provision is the right approach?

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Improvement in local health care facilities. Annual number of new and expanded primary and secondary health care facilities by type.
Number of Planning applications which have secured S106 for health care No specific target

Open Space, Sport and Recreation Facilities

The built and natural environments are important determinants of health and wellbeing. The importance of this role is highlighted in the Promoting Healthy and Safe Communities section of the NPPF. Access to a network of high quality open spaces and opportunities for sport and physical activity is important for the health and well-being of communities.

The link between the provision of open spaces, sport and recreation facilities, and improvements to public health, is perhaps the most obvious. It is widely accepted that participation in physical activity and access to nature in general improves health. It has also been shown to increase self-esteem and can bring significant reduction in mood disturbance (anger, confusion, depression, fatigue and tension).

The attractiveness of streets and green spaces and the availability of green spaces have also been shown to influence the level of walking and their use for physical activity. However, it should be recognised that the simple provision of recreation facilities may not be adequate to change behaviour if the quality and accessibility of the facility is poor. The Foresight Report 'Tackling Obesities' found evidence that, for play spaces to be used by children, the safety, functionality and accessibility of the recreational area is important to parents as well as their perceived quality of the areas.

These spaces also have wider environmental benefits. They support biodiversity, providing valuable habitat and links within existing green networks, which allow wildlife to migrate and better adapt to our changing climate. Open spaces also play a key role in flood risk management and are key elements to developing successful Sustainable Urban Drainage systems.

Sport England’s National Sport Strategy towards an Active Nation (2016) focuses on tackling inactivity and increasing wellbeing through improving physical activity in active environments. It developed its ‘Active Design’ principles with PHE to encourage and promote sport and physical activity through the design and layout of the built environment, and so support a step-change towards healthier and more active lifestyles.

The North Lincolnshire Council Plan 2018/19 aims to keep the people and place of North Lincolnshire well through clean and green spaces, stimulating cultural experiences, vibrant leisure and culture and good health and wellbeing.

The North Lincolnshire Emerging Physical Activity Insight provided by Active Humber (September 2018) shows Physical Activity Measures under inactive, fairly active and active. Inactive is % of people aged 16+ doing less that 30mins of physical activity per week. Duration of activity is bouts of 10min of moderate intensity and is based on 4 years of data. Fairly active is % of people aged 16+ doing at least 30-149 minutes a week of physical activity per week and active is % of people aged 16+ of people aged 16+ doing at least 150 mins of physical activity per week. The insight data showed that in England 61.8% of the population were active, 12.5% fairly active and 25.7% inactive. For North Lincolnshire the data showed 54.7% of the population of North Lincolnshire were active, 13.3% fairly active and 32% (45,500) inactive. This identifies that North Lincolnshire has a lower number of active people compared to the national population and more of the population inactive compared to the national population. Males inactive in North Lincolnshire is 27.8% higher than England 24.4% and females inactive in North Lincolnshire is 34.8% higher than England 26.8%.

A new Active Communities Centre has been built in Crowle and there are new Artificial Grass Pitches at Barton upon Humber, Brigg, Crowle and Epworth with plans to replace the Artificial Grass Pitch at Winterton and construct another at Broughton. A number of new Skate parks are planned for Broughton, Goxhill and Keadby. A further pitch is due to commence at Barton upon Humber (Baysgarth School). Outdoor facilities have been improved and new pavilions provided at Quibell Park, Scunthorpe and Brigg Recreation Ground. A number of new Skate parks are have been achieved: for example at Epworth, Barton, Broughton, and Keadby. Multi Use Games Areas (MUGA’s) also play a significant role in providing local opportunities to engage in physical activity and a number have recently been developed or improved. Other existing sports/leisure centres will need refurbishment or improvement works as time goes by to help them meet community needs. There is also a need to improve the supporting infrastructure for example changing rooms and all weather/floodlit training facilities.

In terms of identifying both deficiencies and requirements for new open space to be provided in association with development; planning policies should be based on robust and up to date assessments of the needs for open space, sports and recreation facilities and opportunities for new provision. The assessments should identify specific needs and quantitative or qualitative deficits or surpluses of open space, sports and recreational facilities in the local area. Information from these assessments should be used to determine what provision and standards are required.

The council will assess recreational need for open space by considering minimum acceptable standards of provision for different types of open space. An Open Space Study was carried out in 2011 and updated in April 2019. A Playing Pitch Strategy was produced in June 2013, which is currently being updated. These studies looked at both the quantity and quality of open space provision and playing pitches. The open space study assessed local provision of all categories of open space from parks, natural open space and amenity greenspace through to playspace and sports facilities as well as allotments. Site assessments demonstrated that the quality of pitches is good, although there remain opportunities for improvement. These have informed the required standards and improvement opportunities. The required standards are summarised in respect of quantity, quality and accessibility of open space and playing pitch provision within North Lincolnshire and have been used to inform the provision requirements for new development as outlined in Policy ID9p Delivering Infrastructure.

North Lincolnshire’s Current Open Space Surplus or Deficiency

Sub-Area All Population Children's Population Parks & Open Space Natural & Semi-Natural Greenspace Outdoor Sports Facilities (excluding Golf Courses) Amenity Greenspace Provision for C&YP (including sites within other typologies) Allotments
Recommended Standard (per 1,000 population) 1.75 10.25 1.22 0.53 0.37 0.18
Area 1 14,590 3,042 -10.31 0.39 -11.95 -6.72 -4.67 -1.89
Area 2 8,363 1,827 -10.39 33.83 2.53 -1.74 -2.33 -1.50
Area 3 12,621 2,480 -9.14 15.02 6.83 -2.69 -3.77 6.87
Area 4 81,998 20,375 -73.02 -628.57 21.30 23.44 -21.85 -3.59
Area 5 11,220 2,413 57.62 401.01 0.40 -2.85 -2.5 -1.02
Area 6 18,238 3,730 -14.28 161.5 -7.02 -2.40 -4.55 -0.17
Area 7 22,790 4,998 41.79 -88.98 -4.13 -9.03 -5.51 -1.51
Area Total 169,820 38,865 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Policy CSC3p: Protection and Provision of Open Space, Sports and Recreation Facilities

The council will work with its partners, appropriate agencies and the voluntary sector to ensure the provision of good quality, well maintained sport and recreation facilities, which meet the needs of the local communities, will be secured, accessible and improved.

In particular, provision will be sought to address identified deficiencies or that will benefit deprived groups and meet the needs of local communities and to improve the quality of, and access to existing open spaces, sports and leisure facilities.

Development proposals for new sports and recreational buildings and land, children’s play facilities, Multi use games area, playing pitch and open space or the extension/enhancement of an existing facility should be on a scale appropriate to the type and size of settlement. Wherever possible facilities that attract large numbers of people should be located in the larger settlements and be accessible by walking, cycling and public transport.

Proposals will be permitted provided that:

  1. There is no adverse impact to nearby properties or habitats, by reason of noise, general disturbance, fumes or external lighting;
  2. They are multifunctional, fit for purpose and support health and outdoor recreation;
  3. They are associated with the identified needs of the community;
  4. They offer greatest accessibility to the public and are easily accessible by means of pedestrian connections;
  5. They consider the context of any existing provision/shortfall and maximise any opportunities for improvement within the wider area where these are relevant to the development of the site;
  6. When new provision is provided, have appropriate mechanisms secured which will ensure the future satisfactory maintenance and management of the open space, sport and leisure facility.

Development proposals that will result in the loss of an existing sport and recreational building, land and facility, children’s play facility, natural greenspace or open space will not be supported unless:

  • There is currently an excess of that provision in the area; or
  • Satisfactory alternative provision equivalent or better quality and quantity in a suitable location is made; or
  • The facility is no longer needed.

In all new residential developments of 10 dwellings or more (or on sites of 0.5ha or more), the Council will require provision of high-quality open spaces, and sport and recreation facilities to meet the needs of additional residents. The types and required standards of these spaces and facilities will be identified in the new Developer Contributions SPD.

On sites of less than 0.5 ha, the developer will be expected to make an appropriate commuted payment to off-site recreational open space provision within the catchment area and to contribute to future maintenance in accordance with the Developer Contributions SPD.

The Council will seek to enter into an agreement with developers which will set out the date of provision and arrangements for the maintenance and management of such areas during the course of development and thereafter.

As first preference, the provision should be provided on-site in a suitable location. Where on site provision is not feasible or suitable within a local context, consideration of a financial contribution to the upgrading and improvement of an existing usable facility will be considered as per the criteria set out in the Developer Contributions SPD and in accordance with national legislation.

Developers will be expected to contribute towards a new sports and leisure facility if the current sports and leisure facilities could not cope with the additional demand.

A holistic approach to the design of new open space should be taken including considering the contribution to place making, the green infrastructure network and protecting and enhancing nature conservation and the water environment. New provision should also aim to protect, enhance and manage integrated paths for active travel and/or recreation, including new and existing links to the wider countryside.

Open space is important for its contribution to the quality of the environment of towns and settlements. Open space with recreational value should be protected from development. Identifying recreational land on the proposals map and considering its wider amenity importance will ensure that its value to the community is taken into account in determining development proposals. It is important to ensure that there is no loss of recreational open space where it is of value to a community.

Having good quality sports and leisure facilities is important. Taking part in recreational activities, particularly outdoors, can improve your physical wellness. Leisure time is important as it gives a person the balance needed to focus on his or her other, more stressful, daily activities. Leisure time relieves boredom and stress and also improves one's physical and emotional health.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. There was overall support for the inclusion of a Local Plan policy for Open Space, Sports and Recreation Facilities.

Access to a network of high quality open spaces and opportunities for sport and physical activity is important for the health and wellbeing of communities. Planning policies should be based on a robust and up to date assessment of the need for open space, sport and recreation facilities. This information has been used to determine what open space, sport and recreational provision is needed which the plan will seek to accommodate.

Question CSC3p

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Allotments

Allotment gardening or involvement in community food growing projects can increase overall levels of physical activity and fitness, contribute to healthy weight, increase healthy fruit and vegetable consumption, improve mental health, contribute to improved social interactions and community cohesion, and reduce stress.

Policy CSC4p: Allotments

The Council will not grant planning permission for development that would result in the loss of allotments unless:

  • the allotment is badly located and a suitable replacement is provided nearby of at least equal size and quality but to a higher visual amenity standard; and
  • the allotment is under-used and no longer meets an important local need and there is unlikely to be a future rise in demand for allotment plots; and
  • the enhancement of nearby existing allotments by a developer may be acceptable, instead of the provision of new replacement allotments.

An adequate supply of allotments will be maintained to meet existing and likely future demand, and their development will not be permitted unless the allotment is no longer required to meet a local need, or the condition of the allotment has deteriorated to such a degree that its refurbishment is not feasible.

Alternatives Considered

The option considered through the consultation was how the Local Plan should consider allotments. There was broad support for protecting and retaining existing allotments and NPPF states planning policies and decisions should aim to achieve healthy, inclusive and safe places, which enable and support access to allotments.

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Development granted planning permission contrary to advice from Sport England. No planning applications approved against the policy requirements.
Number of Appeals upheld contrary to advice from Sport England. No permissions granted contrary to this policy.

Golf Courses

Golf courses require substantial areas of land and inevitably involve changes in landscape character associated with the remodelling of topography and the introduction of artificial features and special maintenance regimes. Without due consideration, valuable wildlife habitats, historical and archaeological features and geological and physiographic features can be damaged or destroyed, either directly or indirectly, for example by drainage works. Conversely, a well designed proposal can enhance the nature conservation value of an area, and provide more diverse habitats and other environmental and landscape benefits. Golf course irrigation can also make substantial demands on local water supplies. Some habitats and landscape types can absorb golf courses without significant impact, and in degraded environments golf courses may offer a positive opportunity for environmental enhancement. Golf courses may also provide an important buffer between housing and agricultural land and between housing and areas of nature or archaeological importance.

Policy CSC5p: Golf Courses

Planning permission will be granted for the improvement of existing golf facilities and the provision of new golf courses and facilities providing that the proposal:

  1. is located, designed and landscaped so as to ensure harmony and good visual integration with the surrounding landscape and does not adversely affect the character and amenity of the area;
  2. makes provision for the retention and management of important landscape features and any landscaping reflects the area’s character in form and choice of species;
  3. does not result in the loss of the best and most versatile agricultural land (Grades 1, 2 and 3a);
  4. does not adversely affect sites of nature conservation value or archaeological or historic importance;
  5. does not require additional built development in the open countryside unrelated to the operational requirements of the golf course;
  6. achieves a high standard of design for any new buildings and hard standings considered necessary and essential to the proper functioning of the golf course in accordance with criterion; and
  7. is of a scale of development in keeping with the golfing facility.

Large scale built development, including housing, hotels, conference centres and sports facilities, is often proposed in association with golf courses, in locations where they would otherwise be refused, sometimes on the grounds that these facilities are required to maintain the viability of the course. Such built development will be strongly resisted in the open countryside.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. NPPF states planning policies and decisions should aim to provide, recreational and cultural facilities.

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Water Based Leisure

North Lincolnshire’s rivers, canals, lakes and reservoirs are a valuable resource for active and passive leisure pursuits.

The Rivers Ancholme, Trent and Humber form navigable links with the country’s waterway network. Marinas provide permanent moorings for boats clear of the navigational channel. At present these resources are largely under-used and offer enormous potential for recreation. The northern area of Ashby Ville lagoon to the south east of the Scunthorpe and Bottesford Urban Area offers a potential site for water based recreation which is currently undertaken on an informal basis. Potential also exists for water based recreation in the Ironstone Gullets area to the north east of Scunthorpe, and at Barton Claypits.

In encouraging water based recreational activities to the environment is an important concern. Some sporting activities, such as fishing, canoeing and wind surfing may be considered less damaging than power boating and water skiing, which cause noise disturbance, create wash that can damage banks and cause oil and petroleum pollution. A large number of users in an area can have an adverse impact on the surrounding countryside, due to increased traffic, litter generation, over-use of paths and banks, and habitat destruction.

Policy CSC6p: Water Based Leisure

Planning permission will be granted for the development of recreational activities on the Rivers Ancholme, Trent and Humber and on inland lagoons and water areas providing the following criteria are met:

  1. the development does not prejudice important amenity, landscape or ecological characteristics of the waterway or water area and its environs. Proposals to extend recreational usage will need to be carefully balanced against the effect they may have on the ecology and wildlife of the waterway or water area;
  2. there is no adverse effect on the provision and improvement of access points and footpath links to the waterway or water area;
  3. recreational and leisure activities do not prejudice the operational requirements of rivers as commercial waterways.

Waterways and water areas in North Lincolnshire are under-utilised as a recreational and tourism resource. The Council is therefore committed to protecting and enhancing the recreation and leisure potential of these areas. This will involve closely controlling adjacent development to ensure that it will not prejudice the recreational use and leisure potential of waterways and water areas. These areas are also important for their nature and wildlife value, provide links in the overall network of green spaces and recreational paths and hence need to be protected from inappropriate development.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. NPPF states planning policies and decisions should aim to provide, recreational and cultural facilities.

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Commercial Horse Riding Establishments

Horse riding offers an attractive way of exploring the countryside, but attendant problems may arise in the case of commercial riding establishments and livery yards. These can potentially be substantial developments with stabling, flood-lit exercise areas and indoor riding schools and even demands for new housing to allow a 24 hour presence on site. In other cases, commercial establishments of this nature can be a positive force in maintaining traditional landscapes, especially where there is a commitment to pasture management and fence maintenance.

Policy CSC7p: Commercial Horse Riding Establishments

Development of commercial horse riding facilities and livery stables will be permitted, subject to proposals meeting the following criteria:

  1. a minimum of 0.6 ha (1.5 acres) of grazing land per horse or pony is available; and
  2. the proposal is of a scale and nature appropriate to the character of the site and the ability of the local environment to absorb the development; and
  3. the proposal does not adversely affect sites of nature conservation value or archaeological or historic importance; and
  4. the proposal uses existing buildings or where new buildings are proposed they are of a high standard of design and are sited next to existing buildings or otherwise visually form an integral part of the overall development; and
  5. the proposal is accompanied by an integrated landscaping scheme and a scheme of boundary treatment; and
  6. the site is accessible and adequate off-road trails and bridleways are available.

Commercial horse riding facilities are a type of land use that will most often be sited in open countryside, and are one of a number of uses that will in principle be suitable in these areas. This will be subject to the proposed development being of an appropriate scale and of a design in keeping with the locality; taking advantage of existing screening and well integrated with existing buildings; being based on a compact building layout; taking account of sites of archaeological importance, in particular upstanding earthwork remains which may be preserved under grazing or pasture land; there being sufficient suitable routes or land for riding in the vicinity without exacerbating pressure on already over-used areas; and incorporating sufficient grazing land as part of the overall development to allow for good pasture management and rotational grazing.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. NPPF states planning policies and decisions should aim to provide, recreational and cultural facilities.

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Education - School Places and Provision

National planning policy regarding education provision aims to offer choice and diversity to meet the needs of existing and new communities. Local planning authorities should take a proactive, positive and collaborative approach to meeting this requirement and to development that will widen choice in education. Great weight should be given to the need to create, expand or alter schools and work with school promoters to identify and resolve key planning issues.

North Lincolnshire’s Economic Growth Plan 2018-2023 focusses on improved skills and lifelong integration of skills and development which are areas where change is required to support prosperity in North Lincolnshire.

North Lincolnshire’s Education and Skills Plan, All Our Children - 2020 sets out the shared ambitions for educating children and young people in North Lincolnshire. The plan focuses on three overarching outcomes, which are:

  • children to feel safe and are safe;
  • children to enjoy good health and emotional wellbeing; and
  • children to recognise and achieve their potential.

North Lincolnshire Council is a statutory education authority. There are 77 schools in North Lincolnshire: 53 primary schools, 4 junior schools, 5 infant schools, 13 secondary schools and 2 special schools. 36 of the primary and infant schools have nursery provision. 3 of the secondary schools have sixth forms offering a wide range of courses and quality post 16 provision. There are also 2 colleges in North Lincolnshire: John Leggott College and North Lindsey College and a University Technical College (UTC). North Lincolnshire has good schools and colleges with 64.8% of North Lincolnshire pupils attaining a 9-4 grade in both maths and english in the 2016/17 academic year, higher than the regional and national rates or 61.8% and 59.1%.

The Council has a School Organisational Needs Assessment (SONA) 2017. The assessment acknowledges the importance of school place planning in achieving these outcomes through the:

  • Effective supply of mainstream places to meet community needs;
  • Creation of a sustainable and coherent estate for life-long learning;
  • Development of an infrastructure in which all providers can quickly adapt to new opportunities;
  • Provision of choice of high quality educational establishments for all our children and young people.

Early Years Estate

As at January 2019, there were almost 3,000 children in receipt of funded early education in North Lincolnshire. The numbers vary each term as children turn two and three-years of age, the numbers of eligible children peak in the summer term each year. In addition to funded early education, many parents are paying privately for childcare hours for their children (from birth to twelve years of age). In total it is estimated that there are 3,500 childcare places for children under five years of age and a further 2,400 places for children over five years of age.

The demand for funded early education is growing as consecutive governments invest in childcare policies to increase the funded childcare offer available to parents. Most recently the introduction of 30-hours funded childcare for three and four year olds and the introduction of Tax Free Childcare to support families with the cost of childcare. All planning areas have experienced growth. Inward migration as a result of major housing developments will increase the demand for childcare places. During initial phases demand will need to be addressed by local providers however demand may quickly exceed supply. The childcare sector does attract investment from the private sector however land allocations or suitable community premises are required.

Primary School Estate

As at January 2017, there were 13,728 pupils on roll in North Lincolnshire schools. There are a diverse range of providers responsible for running these schools. These providers include national academy chains, local multi-academy trusts (MAT), convertor academies and the local authority.

Over recent years there has been an increased demand for school places in the primary sector. The anticipated demand for reception places for the whole of North Lincolnshire is projected to dip. The anticipated total number on roll of North Lincolnshire schools is also anticipated to dip slightly. Inward migration as a result of major housing developments will increase the demand on school places. The Strategic Site Allocation at Lincolnshire Lakes aims to build approximately 6,000 homes, 3,000 of these are expected to be delivered in the plan period. Although three new primary schools will be built on the development to meet demand, the immediate demand from the first wave of occupants, will need to be addressed using existing schools. Although overall numbers are projected to decline, there are significant pressures for individual schools. Whilst children can be accommodated in reception years in the smaller village schools, these schools are often popular and fill up to their published admission number with siblings and non-catchment pupils.

The anticipated total number on roll in North Lincolnshire peaked in 2017/18 and is anticipated to fluctuate to around 13,700 for the next few years. Housing developments will increase demand for places. All planning areas have experienced growth except Isle of Axholme South ward.

The biggest percentage increases have been in Scunthorpe South (20%), Barton District (20%) and Barton Town (14%). The Lakeside development with a new school, St Peter and St Paul, have contributed significantly to the growth in pupils in Scunthorpe South.

Secondary School Estate

The anticipated total number on roll in North Lincolnshire is set to rise from 8,922 in 2017 to 10,299 in 2024. Inward migration as a result of major housing developments will increase the demand on school places. Overall the current supply is sufficient to meet the anticipated number on roll for the next five years. However, there are pressures in some locations, which are noted in the commentary for each planning area. The recent growth in numbers in the primary sector will start to feed through to the secondary sector and increase pressure on places. In addition to larger year groups, inward migration as a result of major housing developments will increase the demand on school places.

The secondary school analysis is based on six planning areas: The Scunthorpe planning area has 7 academies and 1 school that, collectively, provide education for 52% of the secondary aged pupil population; the Brigg planning area has one school and two academies that, collectively, provide education for 20% of the secondary aged pupil population; the Isle north and Isle south planning areas each have one academy that, collectively, provide education for 14% of the secondary aged pupil population; the Barton planning area has one school that provides education for 8% of the secondary aged pupil population; the Winterton planning area has one academy that provides education for 6% of the secondary aged population.

The numbers on roll in the secondary sector have declined over recent years, the lowest point being in 2014/15. The numbers are now on an upwards trajectory as the larger pupil cohorts move up from the primary sector. From 2017 to 2024 it is anticipated that there will be a 15% rise in numbers in the secondary sector. Inward migration as a result of major housing developments will also increase the demand on school places. The Strategic Site Allocation at Lincolnshire Lakes may result in an additional 3,000 homes being built in the plan period, and the current plan is to expand the existing secondary school estate to accommodate this anticipated demand.

Further work to assess the availability of capacity of schools in the area depending on the future option for growth chosen will be carried out. This information will be used to inform the requirements for primary and secondary school places along with the cost for provision of these requirements.

Schools also benefit from having land which is used for sports, recreation, forest schools and school gardens. As community leaders both their indoor and outdoor space contributes greatly to the development of sport and recreation activities (e.g. use of MUGA for local football club, school hall for Judo, sports hall for Streetdance).

Further/Higher Education

North Lincolnshire Council has a priority to deliver a University Campus North Lincolnshire (UCNL) providing higher level skills, offering opportunities to meet the needs of existing businesses to attract inward investment, and to give local residents opportunities closer to home to increase their knowledge and qualification levels. Scunthorpe’s Civic Centre is set to become a new university campus for a scheme, which aims to deliver 1,500 university level places within Scunthorpe. This is in partnership with North Lindsey College and the University of Lincoln. Scunthorpe will also provide a new Post 16 Special Free School.

Key Issues to address through policy and public consultation are effective supply of mainstream places to meet community needs, creation of a sustainable and coherent plan for life-long learning, development of an infrastructure in which all providers can quickly adapt to new opportunities and provision of choice of high quality educational establishments for all our children and young people.

Policy CSC8p: Educational Facilities

It is important that a sufficient choice of school and educational places is available to meet the needs of existing and new communities and requirements of education provision can be met (including early years and childcare).

The following sites are allocated for new and extended school and college facilities:

  • Land at Bowmandale School, Barton Upon Humber
  • Strategic Site Allocation Lincolnshire Lakes, Scunthorpe
  • West Common Lane, Scunthorpe

A new or improved education facility will be supported where:

  1. the scale, range, quality and accessibility of education facilities are improved;
  2. there is a need to create, expand or alter an existing school;
  3. it meets a recognised need in the area it is expected to serve in line with the Council’s legal responsibility to provide sufficient school places;
  4. the proposed development is of a scale and design appropriate to the location;
  5. an area of open space and playing fields sufficient to meet the needs of pupils is incorporated;
  6. the development is capable of a joint or dual use for community benefit, in agreement with the school/academy and this has been incorporated into the design;
  7. proposals that involve the relocation of existing education facilities outside settlement development limits (and redevelopment of the original site for alternative use) will only be supported where the new site would demonstrably better meet the identified education needs and is acceptable in terms of its impacts on the countryside;
  8. the proposal is readily accessible by the community by public transport and by means other than the car; and
  9. sufficient car parking, drop off zones and pedestrian crossings are provided.

Where major new housing proposals would result in an increased demand for education facilities which cannot be met by existing schools and colleges, a developer may be required to enter into a S106 planning obligation in order to secure the provision of, or contribution towards new or extended facilities in accordance with the Developer Contributions SPD.

Major new housing proposals applies to:

  • 25 or more dwellings in the Scunthorpe and Bottesford urban area
  • 15 or more dwellings in principal, medium, and minimum growth settlements.

Calculations are based on the DfES basic need allowance for new places and is linked to the DfES index. The contribution required will be set out in the Developer Contributions SPD and any updates.

At the Planning Application Stage the Council will stipulate if necessary to have Community Use Agreements as part of their planning conditions in order to make the facilities of the school available (when their use is not required by the school).

Alternatives Considered

The option considered was how the Local Plan can ensure the adequate education infrastructure is provided to meet the needs of the local population. National planning policy states it is important that a sufficient choice of school places is available to meet the needs of existing and new communities. Local Planning authorities should take a proactive, positive and collaborative approach to meeting this requirement and to development that will widen choice in education. Local Policies are needed to ensure the needs of existing and new communities are met at a local level.

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Improvements and new additions to Education Facilities 100% of approvals comply with the policy criteria.

Children’s Day Care Provision

There is a growing need for day care facilities for children, as increasing numbers of parents find the need to combine work with childcare responsibilities. The growth of such facilities is an important contributor to allowing more people to enter employment and expanding choice in pre-school education. Such facilities include day nurseries, crèches and playgroups.

Proposals for childcare provision have planning implications including the impact on the amenity of residential areas and the safety and well-being of young children. The use of existing dwelling houses for these purposes will require planning permission once the level of child-space provision from the premises reaches a level where the intensity of the use of the property represents a material change of use. This level will be nominally set at the supervision of or more children at any one time (excluding a family’s own children) although the individual circumstances may dictate that planning permission is required for a lesser number.

Policy CSC9p: Nursery and Children’s Day Care Provision

Any additional children’s day nurseries, crèches and playgroups provision will be encouraged to locate within or adjacent to the Scunthorpe and Bottesford Urban Area, Principal Towns, Larger Service Centres and Larger Rural Settlements or co-located within schools in order to facilitate linked trips by parents.

Applications for new build and the conversion of properties to children’s day nurseries, crèches and playgroups will be determined subject to the following criteria:

  1. the property should be located within an area providing a safe environment for children;
  2. there are facilities for outdoor play separate from car parking and service areas. Where appropriate a carefully designed landscaping scheme shall be incorporated in the development or additional landscaping will be required to supplement existing screening, including the boundaries of the property; and
  3. there is on-site provision for resident and staff cars including satisfactory vehicular access and turning facilities within the site.
  4. The layout and design of these areas will be expected to maximise the safety of children within the site; and

  5. there is adequate space on the highway, or within the site as a dropping-off zone, which allows vehicles to park without causing a hazard to other users on the highway; and
  6. the proposal does not detrimentally alter the character of the area by way of visual impact or cause undue disturbance to neighbours. Where a proposal is within or adjacent to a residential area, conditions will be imposed restricting the hours of operation to those of the working day, i.e. 7.00 am to 6.00 pm Monday to Saturday inclusive, and may also be imposed limiting the number of children to 7 being cared for at any one time.

Any consent may be restricted to the specific use applied for, or to only some of the other uses within Use Class D1 (Non-Residential Institutions) of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987 (as amended).

The provision of childcare facilities, while of considerable community benefit, can result in loss of amenity through noise and disturbance, and excessive vehicle movements in residential areas. In other locations, particularly industrial areas, the surrounding environment of heavy vehicles can prove unsuitable for childcare facilities. Because other uses within Class D1, such as a house resulting in public assembly could potentially cause amenity problems in some locations, the Council will aim to restrict some or all changes of use within the Use Class D1 where appropriate.

Alternatives Considered

No alternatives options considered. NPPF is silent in relation to children’s day care provision. NPPF sets out the purpose of the planning system as being ‘to contribute to the achievement of sustainable development’. Creating places that are safe, inclusive and accessible and which promote health and well-being is recognised by the NPPF. Planning policies should aim to achieve healthy, inclusive and safe places. There are no reasonable alternatives.

Question CSC9p

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of permissions granted contrary to this policy. No permissions granted contrary to this policy.

Community Facilities and Services

Community facilities and services includes facilities such as local shops, meeting places, sports venues, cultural buildings, public houses, places of worship and other local services that enhance the sustainability of communities and residential environments. There are many existing facilities embedded within our settlements that provide for the health and wellbeing, social, educational, recreational, leisure and cultural needs of the community. Some of these serve a local community, while some serve a wider area or serve a group or cluster of interdependent settlements. These facilities and services help create supportive communities by meeting day to day needs of residents and businesses.

To be sustainable, suitable good quality facilities must be provided locally, whilst those that attract large numbers of visitors are accessible by walking, cycling and public transport. This particularly benefits the less mobile and more deprived members of the community.

The North Lincolnshire Council Plan 2018/19 aims to have strong communities and to create neighbourhoods where people are proud to live, get on well together and support each other. The Council will seek to ensure that community facilities and services are provided in the most effective and accessible way. In rural communities, services must be protected as much as possible, as their loss can have a major impact on communities. The provision of local community facilities and services is essential to the quality of life for local residents as they encourage community cohesion and social interaction, healthy lifestyles, improve the ‘liveability’ of places, provide employment opportunities and will reduce the need for people to travel to obtain essential services.

Key issues to address are:

  • building inclusive and healthy communities with good and reasonable access to well located high quality key services and community facilities,
  • protecting existing community facilities; and
  • the delivery of new facilities to meet community needs and promoting healthy lifestyles through support for initiatives such as provision of sports and recreation facilities and improved access to green infrastructure.

A key challenge will be to ensure that the correct amount and type of facilities are delivered as part of future growth proposals to meet community needs.

Policy CSC10p: Community Facilities and Services

The provision of new community facilities, or the improvement of existing community facilities, which meet the needs of local residents will be supported in principle.

Good quality services and facilities will be provided that meet the needs of local communities and are accessible by public transport, cycling or on foot and be accessible for all members of society. They should be designed so that they are adaptable and can be easily altered to respond to future demands if necessary.

The provision of new facilities should be focused in the following locations:

  1. Sites allocated for such purposes.
  2. In town centres, market town centres, district centres or local centres subject to policies in the local plan.
  3. In market towns, rural settlements and rural settlements in the countryside where the facility is needed to serve the immediate local area and could not be provided elsewhere.
  4. In residential areas where there is no adverse effect on the amenities of neighbouring properties.

The provision of services and facilities will be of the scale appropriate to the type and size of the settlement.

The loss of community facilities or land allocated for such purposes will be resisted, unless there is no longer a need for the land or building in any form of community use, or there is an acceptable alternative means of meeting such need.

Developers will be expected to make an appropriate contribution towards necessary improvements or additional provision for community services and facilities arising from their development proposals.

An analysis of the need for the community facilities and services will be undertaken on a site-by-site basis, taking account of the type of asset and any existing provisions. Similarly, the context of the site and the function and purpose of the use will determine the extent of the local community that the use serves. The term “local” will differ between circumstances; for example, the local community of a single public house in a village would likely be the residents of that village. For a children’s home, “local” could be more wide-reaching, covering the catchment area that the children’s home would serve.

Alternatives Considered

The Option considered was would a policy that seeks to retain community facilities and support new community facilities in sustainable locations (including the provision of shared space) and that seeks to plan positively for the provision of local community facilities and services be supported. Majority of respondents supported this approach and guarding against the unnecessary loss of valued facilities and services is a requirement of national policy. This policy seeks to interpret this requirement.

Question CSC10p

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Percentage of approved proposals that comply with the principles of the policy. 100% of approvals that comply with the policy principles.

Entertainment and Cultural Facilities

The retention of community facilities in settlements is considered essential in maintaining the long term vitality and viability of these areas.

Policies and decisions should aim to achieve places, which promote opportunities for meetings between members of the community who might not come into contact with each other, including mixed use developments, strong neighbourhood centres and active street frontages which bring together those who work, reside and play in the vicinity.

Policies should also plan positively for the provision and use of shared space, community facilities and other local services to enhance the sustainability of communities and residential environments.

Policy CSC11p: Entertainment and Cultural Facilities

Planning applications for development, which increases the provision of cultural/entertainment facilities in the area will be permitted in town centres subject to there being no conflict with other policies within this Plan.

The development of museums, arts and entertainment facilities in the area offer opportunities to raise the overall image of North Lincolnshire and the quality of life for its residents. There are still opportunities to further develop cultural and entertainment facilities for heritage interpretation, performances, exhibitions and other activities.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered through the consultation. NPPF states planning policies and decisions should aim to provide, recreational and cultural facilities.

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Restaurants and Hot Food Takeaway Establishments

Policy CSC12p: Restaurants and Hot Food Takeaway Establishments

Proposals for restaurant and hot food takeaway establishments (Use Class A5) will be permitted in town, district and local centres subject to the following criteria:

  1. the premises are not located where individually or cumulatively they would have an adverse impact on the occupiers of nearby residential properties by reason of noise and disturbance, litter or on-street parking;
  2. the development must not create a road safety hazard or create traffic congestion, due to it being located on a bend, junction, hill or any other restriction on the public highway;
  3. suitable off or on-street parking is available on or near the premises so as to avoid detriment to road safety or residential amenity;
  4. a suitable fume extraction system and refuse storage area is installed to ensure that the amenity of nearby residents is protected from the emission of smells and fumes;
  5. when planning permission is granted for restaurants and hot food takeaway establishments, the Council will consider whether it is desirable to impose conditions, including limiting the hours that the premises may remain open, so as to avoid possible loss of amenity to nearby residents resulting from noise and disturbance.
  6. Proposals for hot food takeaways (A5) need to demonstrate that account has been taken of whether the proposal would result in an unacceptable concentration of A5 uses in the centre and in order to promote healthy lifestyles in young people, proposals for A5 uses outside of defined centres but within 400m of an existing or proposed school or college building will be resisted.

Takeaway food establishments and restaurants can add to the quality and attractiveness of existing centres and provide a useful service to shoppers and local residents. However, at the same time they can cause a nuisance both in the immediate area of the facility itself, through problems with noise, smell, traffic and litter, as well as further away.

Dietary risk factors for obesity include high energy density foods, diets high in fat and low in fibre, sugar-rich drinks, and consumption of large portion sizes. The proportion of food eaten outside the home has increased in recent years. This is an important factor contributing to increasing levels of obesity. Food eaten outside the home is more likely to be high in calories and hot food takeaways tend to sell food that is high in fat and salt, and low in fibre, fruit and vegetables. Studies show that regular consumption of energy dense food from hot food takeaways is associated with weight gain.

The NPPF recognises the role that planning can play in better enabling people to live healthier lives. Locally, key indicators of health show that there is a need to improve health and that obesity is one of the key issues. Locating interacting uses, e.g. homes, workplaces and shops, so that it is easy for people to walk or cycle between them, rather than depend on use of cars as part of a solution. Childhood obesity has specifically been identified as a significant threat to children with additional implications for long-term adult health.

In 2008 the Government published Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives which encouraged Councils to use planning powers to control more carefully the rising numbers of fast food takeaways. Whilst this document is now dated, the 2013 Public Health reforms were based upon returning much of the responsibility for local public health to individual Councils and health and well-being boards. There remains a clear message highlighting that local planning authorities should work with public health leads and organisations to understand and take account of the health status and needs of the local population. It is appropriate, therefore to consider what steps can be taken here. Currently, both recorded and estimated levels of adult excess weight in North Lincolnshire are above the national average, with an estimated 70% of adults obese or overweight, compared with 65% nationally. The risk of childhood obesity is therefore likely to be higher locally, and as adult rates increase, so does the risk amongst children.

The Council’s aim is to assist local communities in providing Restaurants and Hot Food Takeaway Establishments within the neighbourhoods they serve, while protecting the amenity of residents in these areas.

Alternatives Considered

The option considered through the consultation was should we look to limit the number of hot food takeaways in some locations where there is an over concentration and/or they are close to schools or does this unfairly prejudice commercial interests. A majority of respondents stated that the Council should seek to limit the number of hot food takeaways in some locations through planning policy, particularly where there is over concentration or are close to schools. The main reasons for supporting this approach are that there are increasing levels of obesity amongst the population, whilst some areas already are dominated by hot food takeaway/fast food outlets. NPPF states planning policies should plan positively for the provision of local services to enhance the sustainability of communities and create places that are safe, inclusive and accessible and which promote health and well-being.

Question CSC12p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC12p: Restaurants and Hot Food Takeaway Establishments is the right approach?

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of approved proposals that comply with the policy criteria. 100% of approvals that comply with the policy principles.

Burial and Cemetery Provision

Cemeteries are a necessary community need. This function is not only related to a practical social land use, but also has recreational and archaeological value in terms of providing open space and historical information.

The Council has Woodlands Crematorium with chapel facilities and burial facilities in eight public cemeteries. Other cemeteries in North Lincolnshire are Crosby Cemetery, Brumby Cemetery, Brigg Cemetery, Scawby Cemetery, Barton Cemetery, Barrow Cemetery and Winterton Cemetery.

Policy CSC13p: Burial Grounds and Cemetery Provision

Cemetery sites are proposed at the following locations:

  1. Land at Plymouth Road, Scunthorpe

If a need is identified for any other new cemeteries in North Lincolnshire, sites should be located adjacent or in close proximity to existing cemetery and crematoria facilities.

A need has been identified to extend the existing cemetery facilities on land at Plymouth Road, Scunthorpe. The policy also addresses the possible need for further cemetery facilities arising in North Lincolnshire. If a need does arise, sites should be located adjacent or in close proximity to existing cemeteries and crematoria in order to help to reduce vehicle journeys and trip lengths.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. National planning policy regarding promoting healthy and safe communities states planning policies should provide social, recreational and cultural facilities the community needs. Local policies are needed to ensure the needs of existing and new communities are met at a local level.

Question CSC13p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC13p: Burial Grounds and Cemetery Provision is the right approach?

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Churches, Prayer Houses and other Places of Worship

Policy CSC14p: Churches, Prayer Houses and other Places of Worship

Applications for planning permission for the change of use of properties and the extension of existing places of worship, and the construction of new buildings as places of worship will be approved subject to the following criteria:

  1. the property should preferably be detached. Applications for the conversion of semi-detached or terraced houses to places of worship will only be approved where the adjoining property is in some form of non-residential use or is occupied by a religious official associated with the proposed development; and
  2. the proposal does not lead to loss of amenity to any residential properties in the vicinity.

Any consent may be restricted to the specific use applied for, or to only some of the other uses within Use Class D1.

The Council’s aim is to assist local communities in providing places of worship for all denominations and religions within the neighbourhoods they serve, while protecting the amenity of residents in these areas.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. National planning policy regarding promoting healthy and safe communities states planning policies should provide social, recreational and cultural facilities the community needs. Local Policies are needed to ensure the needs of existing and new communities are met at a local level.

Question CSC14p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC14p: Churches, Prayer Houses and other Places of Worship is the right approach?

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Tourism and Visitor Accommodation

Tourism is a growth industry, which contributes £167m to the North Lincolnshire economy. Over 4,000 people are employed locally in the industry. In 2014 there were 3.1m day visits to North Lincolnshire attractions.

There are currently 1,266 serviced bed spaces and over 40 visitor attractions, which include art galleries, historic market towns, the birthplace of world Methodism, Normanby Hall, the Humber Estuary, Thorne and Crowle Moors and the surrounding attractive countryside have a huge role to play in developing and moving forward North Lincolnshire’s tourism offer.

Day visits are the main income for tourism sector businesses. The area’s geographic position – within an hour’s drive of major centres of population such as Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield and Hull – makes it an easily accessible and attractive proposition. The majority of visitors to our market towns are from within the UK. Of those asked, 77 per cent said they were on a leisure trip, 12 per cent visiting friends and relatives and 11 per cent on special shopping trips. Of those who are visiting market towns, 44 per cent of visitors said they would be happy to return to the town and likely to make a repeat visit.

The development of tourism in North Lincolnshire is important in providing economic support for local people and for reinforcing local culture and local distinctiveness. Tourism can also provide a strong impetus for environmental enhancement, including the restoration of historic buildings, the interpretation of archaeological sites, the conservation of past industrial areas, and the enhancement of the countryside and water environment. If insensitively handled, however, it can lead to a rapid dilution of local character, cause damage to sensitive areas and threaten local qualities that attract visitors in the first place.

North Lincolnshire Council is committed to enhancing the visitor offer by focusing on five themes:

  • Best place for outdoor activities
  • Best place for culture, heritage and arts
  • Best place for food and accommodation
  • Best place for rural countryside, nature and green space
  • Best place for market experience
Policy CSC15p: Tourism and Visitor Attractions

The visitor sector is an important and resilient part of the area’s economy. In order to raise the quality of the visitor experience, the provision of new visitor attractions or the expansion of existing attractions will be permitted provided:

  1. it is located in sustainable and accessible locations or can be made so;
  2. it is appropriate to the site’s location in terms of scale, design, layout and materials;
  3. it does not have an unacceptable adverse impact on the areas valuable natural, built or heritage assets and helps to enhance any affected asset;
  4. it can demonstrate the viability of the new attraction or where appropriate helps support the viability of an existing attraction; and
  5. it enhances and complements existing visitor attractions or priorities in the area and supports the development of a year-round visitor economy and/or extends visitor stays.

Where a countryside location is necessary the development should:

  • meet identified visitor needs;
  • support local employment and community services;
  • ensure adequate infrastructure; and
  • relate to an existing tourism asset that is based upon a site specific natural or heritage feature.

Large Scale Development

Comprehensive masterplanning and a robust business plan to articulate the potential impacts, proposed mitigation and economic, social and environmental benefits should accompany applications for large scale new or expanding visitor attractions.

New visitor attractions will be directed to accessible and sustainable locations in the first instance in order to address the need to develop the visitor offer and encourage visitors to stay longer. Where development is not in accessible locations it will be focussed on the conversion of existing buildings and developments that contribute to rural diversification, enjoyment of the countryside and access to heritage.

Planning for tourism should make the most of our assets, enriching them rather than harming the very character, quality and beauty that makes them attractive to residents and visitors. This can be achieved by ensuring development is appropriately located and levels of visitor activity are not likely to significantly affect protected sites and species, particularly those of National and European Importance.

To encourage a broad range of visitors in addition to day visitors, and to meet the accommodation needs of businesses in the area, it is necessary to offer a wide range of visitor accommodation including hotels, bed and breakfasts and self-catering facilities.

In terms of existing provision, Scunthorpe in particular lacks hotel accommodation of the size and quality to fully capitalise on the market for accommodating local business visitors. The North Lincolnshire area as a whole acts as both a visitor attraction in itself and as a touring base for the wider Lincolnshire and North Humber Bank area, and as such, offers wide opportunities for expanding accommodation.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. NPPF supports a prosperous rural economy through sustainable rural tourism and leisure developments, which respect the character of the countryside.

Question CSC15p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC15p: Tourism and Visitor Attractions is the right approach?

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of approved proposals that comply with the policy criteria. 100% of approvals that comply with the policy principles.

Hotel and Guest House Accommodation

Policy CSC16p: Hotel and Guest House Accommodation

Within defined settlement boundaries new hotels, guest houses and bed and breakfast accommodation will be permitted provided that the development proposed is compatible with its surroundings in terms of siting, scale, design, materials and landscaping, and neighbouring residential amenity will not be detrimentally affected.

In the open countryside outside defined settlement boundaries planning permission will be granted for:

  1. the extension of existing hotels, guest houses, public houses and farmhouse/bed and breakfast accommodation;
  2. the provision of visitor accommodation within the curtilage of existing public houses and restaurants;
  3. the change of use of residential premises; and
  4. the conversion of rural buildings; including those of architectural or historic merit provided that the development proposed;
    1. is compatible with its surroundings in terms of siting, scale, design materials and landscaping;
    2. does not have an adverse effect on the character and appearance of the open countryside;
    3. would not be harmful to highway safety or have a detrimental impact on the free flow of traffic on the adjacent highway network; and
    4. does not harm neighbouring residential amenity.

The policy emphasises how hotel development can bring economic and employment benefits for the local community.

Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered through the consultation. NPPF states planning policies and decisions should aim to provide, recreational and cultural facilities.

Question CSC16p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC16p: Hotel and Guest House Accommodation is the right approach?

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Camping and Caravan Sites

Camping and caravan sites can make a valuable contribution towards providing inexpensive visitor accommodation in the area. Such facilities can however be a particularly intrusive element in the open countryside. A distinction must also be made between static caravan sites and chalets (which can be highly intrusive), and touring caravan sites, which are generally of a smaller scale with caravans removed during the winter and problems of off-season storage being largely avoided.

Touring caravan sites tend not to be intrusive in the landscape. Static holiday caravan and chalet sites are an all year round feature in the countryside, and place demands on infrastructure and services. They do, however, have a generally higher standard and wider range of facilities than touring sites and can contribute to the development of tourism and the rural economy. By directing the development of these sites mainly to principal recreational attractions, their environmental impact on the countryside can be minimised. Sporadic development, however, can cause uncertainty in infrastructure provision and place undue pressure on the surrounding locality and rural communities.

Transit and touring camping or caravan facilities are generally a less damaging feature on the open countryside than sites for static holiday caravans and chalets. The need for on-site facilities and in some instances warden’s accommodation, is recognised but these should be restricted to the site’s immediate needs. A touring site should not be seen as a reason for erecting new dwellings or additional facilities such as shops, cafés and petrol stations in the countryside, which would not be permitted under other policies in this Local Plan.

Policy CSC17p: Camping and Caravan Sites

New caravan and camping facilities (both touring and static) will be granted planning permission provided:

  1. the development is closely associated with existing or proposed recreational and tourist attractions and is of an appropriate scale having regard to the size and type of attraction with which it is associated; and
  2. the site can be suitably screened by existing land forms and/or the provision of a scheme of landscaping; and
  3. the provision of any built development is restricted to those essential facilities which are required to service the site.
  4. In granting planning permission conditions will be imposed, where necessary, restricting the use of the site to holiday lettings.

    A change of use of existing transit and touring caravan and camping facilities to static holiday caravans or chalets will not be permitted unless the site is:

    1. closely associated with a major existing or proposed recreational and tourist attraction;
    2. the development is of an appropriate scale in relation to its setting and there is no material adverse impact upon the amenity and character of the locality; and
    3. existing sewerage facilities are capable of being upgraded to accommodate the intensified use of the site. Conditions will be imposed requiring such improvements in landscaping and screening as are necessitated by the intensified use of the site.
Alternatives Considered

No alternative options considered. National planning policy regarding tourism and leisure developments states planning policies and decisions should enable sustainable rural tourism and leisure developments which respect the character of the countryside. Local policies are needed to ensure the needs of existing and new communities are met at a local level.

Question CSC17p

Do you think the Preferred Policy CSC17p: Camping and Caravan Sites is the right approach?

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Monitoring

Indicator Target
Number of approved proposals that comply with the policy criteria. 100% of approvals that comply with the policy principles.